Sacred images of Krishna at Blanton Museum of Art

Stories and Images of Krishna for Janmashtami

Krishna’s Birth and Janmashtami 

Images of Krishna and RadhaJanmashtami is an important Vaishnava holiday commemorating the birth of Krishna. A two-day celebration takes place this weekend at Austin’s Radha Madhav Dham temple and gardens. In San Antonio, Krishna communities host events, Sunday. In all, images of Krishna will be venerated. That’s because, according to the ancient texts, Lord Krishna is an incarnation of Vishnu. In fact, the name Krishna, means all attractive. 

Swami Sivananda, in “Bliss Divine” writes, “Vishnu incarnated with lotus eyes, with four hands armed with conch, disc, mace and lotus, with the mark of Srivatsa adorning the chest. Vasudeva (his birth mother) saw this marvel of a divine child.”

“He was the world-teacher,” says Sivananda of Krishna. “Sri Krishna was a perfect Master.  He was a Karma Yogi, Bhakta, Raja Yogi and Jnana Yogi. He preached Karma, Upasana (worship), Yoga and Jnana. The four Yogas are blended in His Gita or the Immortal Song. He was the one Lord of love. His enchanting form, with flute in hand, holds the heart of India captive in chains, even today.”

The Times of India says Lord Krishna was born 5,200 years ago and his birthplace is lit up on Janmashtami. The newspaper refers to the “Bhagavad Gita” to further describe this day.  “…whenever there will be a predominance of evil and decline of religion, Lord Vishnu will reincarnate and save the earth from all that is evil. The main purpose behind the celebration of Janmashtami along with Lord Krishna’s birthday is the prevalence of goodwill and this is what unites people from different regions together on the auspicious occasion.”

Stories Come to Life

images of krishna and garudaThese tales, and more, are depicted in illustrations from a San Diego collection.

Most are based on epics like the Ramayana or Bhagavata Purana.

One area, however, is devoted to Persian-language literature like the Shahnama. Yet another area, is musical illustrations. These are known as Ragamala. Typically, these were sets of 36 paintings, thus, creating a garland (mala) of images pertaining to the music (ragas)

The exhibit is at Austin’s Blanton Museum of Art through October 1.  Epic Tales from Ancient India features stories and images of Krishna. Traditional Indian music is piped into the gallery space. 

There are dozens and dozens of illustrations of Krishna and others from the ancient scriptures in the Blanton exhibit. Images of Krishna, Yashoda, Radha, Balaram are mostly from the 1600s. They tend to be very detailed, tiny stories on paper.

Here are a few examples.

Images of Krishna in Art

birth of KrishnaTo protect Krishna against a terrible prophesy, his birth parents entrusted him to Yashoda and Nanda. Krishna’s birth, and escape from the jail where he was born, are expressed in a watercolor circa 1560.

The exhibit description explains several of the scenes in this piece. 

“When Devaki gives birth to her eight son, Krishna, no ordinary infant, but rather an incarnation of the god Vishnu, a carefully conceived plan ensures the child’s safety.  In this image, the blue-skinned Krishna sits on a lotus throne…At the center, the prison door is left unchained. Its two guards and their dogs have fallen fast asleep, enabling Vasudeva and Krishna’s midnight escape to the distant land where Krishna will be raised.” 

Krishna overcomes BakasuraKamsa sends demons out to harm baby Krishna. One of those demons is disguised as a crane, Bakasura.  

“Bakasura attacked from behind a tree, capturing Krishna in his beak, In the story, the crane swallows Krishna but is forced to expel him when his palate begins to burn…Krishna seizes the two halves of Bakasura’s beak to rip the crane into two pieces as his brother, Balarama, and another cowherd boy wield their sticks to assist in subduing the demon.” 

In another tale, Krishna overcomes a forest fire. After defeating a serpent, Krishna and his father return home. Tired, the fall asleep at the Yamuna river.  

“At this point, a massive forest fire starts, and Krishna must rescue his people again. In the illustration, the fire that encircles the group looks like a garland of yellow flowers, within which Krishna is depicted twice…On the left, he sleeps alongside his brother Balarama and foster father Nanda…On the right, he drinks up the flames…”  

images of krishna and gopisAn opaque watercolor, from the mid 1700s shows Krishna explaining worship. There are multiple stories within the painting, representing how worship is passed on, from one to another. The eye is drawn to a colorful flower. At the yellow center of the flower, are Vishnu and Garuda. His attendants and other deities are pictured on each of the eight pink petals. 

A gallery text explains one of the pieces from around 1690.

“A telling of the story in the vernacular language of Brajbasha on the verso describes Krishna as sitting among the gopis as they together form a circle and enact the rasalila performance. Krishna multiplies himself and dances between the women. Witnessing this wonderful spectacle, gods gather while heavenly musicians and dancers join in the revelry.”

Krishna was ever popular among the gopis (cow herder girls).

“The love that the Gopis bore towards Krishna was a divine love. It was the union of souls,” says Sivananda. He adds that his flute attracted them. “It produced God-intoxication in all beings and infused life even in insentient objects. The sweetness of the music was unsurpassed.”

Epic Tales from Ancient India in Austin

Epic Tales from Ancient IndiaAs part of the Blanton show, there will be a sarod and tabla concert on September 21. Then, on September 22, there will be a lecture. Additionally, each Thursday, Saturday and Sunday will be storytelling and dance. A UT grad student, with then years of Indian classical dance experience, will perform.

The Blanton was founded in 1963 as UT’s Art Museum. Therefore, admission is free to current UT staff and students. Likewise, admission is free for teachers and active military. Typically, the museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays until 5 p.m. However, the third Thursday of every month, the museum is open until 9 p.m.

Dhanvantari, deity for Ayurveda

Natural Healing According to a Nicaraguan Herbalist vs Ayurveda

To learn about natural healing, I choose a homestay with Dona Lucia in Nicaragua.  Call her a curandera, herbalist, or a campesina. Clearly, Lucia understands the value of nature as medicine. We relate. First, I believe in natural healing. For example, I have great respect for the Ayurvedic, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Indigenous teachings. 

homemade milk in NicaraguaPlant-based Organic Foods

Secondly, I am an advocate of plant-based diets. In these remote mountains, families eat mostly organic vegetarian foods. They aren’t following trends. Rather, they are self-sufficient.

They respect their farm animals. Actually, Lucia’s husband milks their cows daily. And, with the several buckets of milk they get, daily, they make their own cheese. Due to no refrigeration, cheese is consumed quickly.

As a result, Lucia’s typical plate has rice, beans, fresh tortillas, plantains and cheese. At times, she may add a bit of vegetables or chicken. What’s more, thermoses of coffee and herbal tea stay on the table all day. 

Their water comes from a well. Likewise, light comes from solar panels. These homes have no outlets. Nor, flush toilets. Yet, they have large rooms with beautiful plants and trees surrounding them. 

Natural Healing Tips from Nicaragua

natural healing in NicaraguaInterestingly, while Lucia and I come from different backgrounds, many of her natural healing recipes are similar to mine.

Spinach.  My body craves spinach. Lucia says that it’s good for the blood and circulation. I know I need circulation boosts.

Basil.  Lucia makes a compress out of basil. She adds cedar, basilica and garlic for bruises or body pains. Basilica, she says, is good for the nerves and low blood pressure/fainting.

Cilantro helps restore the levels of iron in the blood, she says. It’s also good for colic. Ayurvedically speaking, cilantro is a great balancer for the doshas. I add it to all my juices and smoothies.

natural healing in NicaraguaGinger. Hands down, this one of my favorites. I make fresh ginger lemon tea, daily.  In my book, it’s good for the thyroid and digestion. It’s also a good dosha balancer, particularly for those with tendencies for respiratory issues. Not surprisingly, Lucia uses it for digestion, plus coughs. 

Licorice. Ayurvedic wisdom says licorice pacifies vata and pitta. Among other things, it is an expectorant.  Lucia claims that it is good for the throat. In particular, for people that are feeling hoarse.

Absinth (Wormwood). Not as common as some of the other herbs, this is one Lucia likes for internal and external infections.

Lemongrass. I once interviewed someone about the healing qualities of lemongrass, according to traditional Thai beliefs.  While it tastes great in stir fry, the essential oil smells wonderful, too. In India, not unlike in Thailand, lemongrass is credited for healing many disorders. Lucia says it’s good for de-stressing. Once stress is managed, you can minimize other dis-eases.

Epazote. Native to Central America, this herb is believed to be beneficial in the treatment of parasites. Lucia says it’s also good for cramps. 

Altamisa/Mugwort. This is your PMS relief, according to Lucia. Similarly, Ayurveda says it’s good for the uterus, and hormonal cramping or discomfort. 

Valerian. Lately, valerian is popular in the Western world. Many enjoy valerian essential oil to help them sleep at night. Ayurvedic recommendations for valerian include to ease the nerves and promote blissful sleep. It’s also suggested to help skin, digestion, and balancing of the doshas. So, it’s not surprising that Lucia uses this herb for insomnia and nerves.

Waste Not, Want Not

In the mountains where Lucia lives, nothing is wasted. They buy their own rice and oil, but most everything else is from their farm.

Lucia and her husband give the bad corn kernels to the livestock to eat. The corn ears are used as firewood in their wood-burning stove. 

They use all parts of plants. For example, Lucia takes resin from the banana root and infuses it in hot water to treat diarrhea. The leaves of oranges, along with many other fruit leaves, are used to flavor herbal teas. Plus, they provide medicinal oomph.

Don’t Leave Out the Leaf

herbalists natural healing vs Ayurveda

Orange.  This one, according to Lucia, is good for balancing the nerves. She also says it’s good for pregnant women. 

Guarumo. Here’s another example of taking leaves of a Mesoamerican tree for medicinal uses. Lucia suggests soaking the guarumo leaves in hot water and making compresses. These are good for intestinal woes like colitis.

Dandelion. These nasty weeds are getting popular among the natural healing crowds.  Lucia recommends it for anemia. Not surprising, it is loaded with vitamins and minerals, including iron.  In Ayurveda, dandelion is said to help balance the liver and blood. Dandelion tea is especially appropriate for counteracting pitta imbalances. 

Mango. Lucia uses mango leaves for teas, compresses and bathing. She says it’s good for inflammation. I add fresh ginger to my home-made mango juice. With cilantro, it’s refreshing and balancing for the doshas.  

Guava used for natural healingGuava. I have an extreme dislike for cough syrups. Primarily because they have a high alcohol content. Fruit leaf tea seems more soothing. Lucia says it works, and that it’s also good for nausea and vomiting. According to TheAyurveda.org, guava is good to reduce phlegm. And, “Since, 1950s the leaves of Guava tree is used as a potential medicine to cure many diseases like Diabetes, cholesterol and heart problems.”

Limonaria. Here’s another leaf that shouldn’t be discarded. Lucia says it can be used for toothaches. Of course, a dentist is the best fix. But, when you’re isolated in the mountains, you need first-respondent natural healing care even more. 

Jocote. This is a Central American fruit.  Lucia takes the leaf and grinds it up. Then, she adds it to the juice, with lemon, to soothe ulcers. 

Cinnamon. Beyond the sticks, Lucia says the leaves are good in tea for pregnant women. She often mixes them with fruit leaves.

Finally, read more about life in this remote agricultural community. Or, learn more about Ayurvedic diets, on one of my blog posts. 

Jaya Lakshmi at Bhakti Fest

Benefits of Bhakti: Chanting and Singing Feels Good

Sankirtana. Singing feels good.Music is a part of my life. I play no instruments. I’m not a trained musician. But, music is in my heart, and in every cell of my body. That’s why chanting (bhakti yoga or kirtan) is one of the most important aspects of yoga for me. Yes, chanting is yoga. As is dancing. 

When I was a kid, I felt something special when I would sing with my sister. After seeing “The Sound of Music” and “Mary Poppins,” some of the songs were on automatic replay in my head. I couldn’t stop singing. Now, it’s the same way. But it’s mantras that keep circulating through my heart and my mind. I try to share that appreciation with my students. In classes, even if I’m playing Mary J. Blige or Stephen Marley, I’ll intersperse a rhythmic mantra.  

Sankirtana. Singing feels good.Once or twice a year, I go to kirtan festivals. Recently, I was in California for Bhakti Fest. The following weekend I went to North Carolina for Sadhu Sanga. Both were gatherings of several thousand bhaktas. People, like me, that have been touched by the power of sankirtana (group chanting).

One of the most beautiful things about Bhakti Fest and Sadhu Sanga is the energy. Beyond the beautiful sounds and rhythms, there is a special atmosphere. Bliss. Devotion. Whatever you want to call it. That’s what bhakti is all about. In fact, one of the translations for bhakti is devotion. When you practice san kirtan that special feeling is magnified a thousand times.

Kirtan Fest Houston

Kirtan Fest HoustonNow, there’s a kirtan festival in Texas.  Labor Day weekend. September 2 to September 4.  The venue is the most beautiful ISKCON temple.

Kirtan Fest Houston brings together kirtan artists who travel around the world. Karnamrita Das is one. I’ve sung with her in California. Amala Kirtan Das is a Brazilian-born musician with whom I’ve chanted several times in Austin. In addition to many others leading the group chanting will be San Antonio’s Advaita Acharya Das. He’s my personal conductor. He’s moved my life in many ways. Not just getting me to dance or sing, but to make a difference in my life. To live the principles of yoga.

This is your chance to feel the power of group chanting without leaving the big state of Texas. In fact, Advaita is coordinating caravans to get to and from Houston. 

Kirtan Fest HoustonAdvaita quotes the scriptures to explain the value of chanting. 

“Compared to that person who is attached to chanting japa (beads), the person who performs loud chanting of the holy name of Sri Hari is one hundred times better. This is because the person who chants japa purifies himself, whereas the person who chants the holy name loudly in kirtana purifies himself, all those who are with him, and everyone else who hear the holy vibration.”

Quoting the scriptures, he adds, “The animals, birds, and insects cannot chant the holy name, but by hearing the holy name chanted they can benefit. Chanting the japa of the holy name of Krishna purifies oneself, but the loud sankirtana of the holy name of Krishna benefits all living beings. Therefore, loudly chant the holy name of Krishna in kirtana, and you will get one hundred times the benefit of chanting japa. This is the verdict of all the sastras.”

Advaita’s Tips for First Time Chanting

1) Get as close to the kirtan circle as possible. Imagine fire. The closer you are, the more wholesome is the experience.
2) Don’t burn yourself.  Respect the fire. Respect kirtan sound and you will be able to feel something without touching it, and see something with your eyes closed.
3) Don’t come to kirtan tired. Don’t over eat, or eat not enough. 
4) Remember your body is a temple. Focus on PPP:  Posture. Pronunciation. Presence.

It Feels Good

Girish is one of the frequent Bhakti Fest musicians. At this year’s Shakti Fest I attended one of his workshops. Kind of like Singing 101.  

“Every one of us is born to sing,” he said. “Each and every one of our bodies is a unique musical instrument. Are we a cello, or are we a flute, or trombone in this symphony of life?”

Girish pointed to research that validates what I learned as a young kid. Singing feels good.

Chanting is Good for you“It’s scientifically proven that singing is really really good for us. Singers have lower cortisol levels, by about 15 percent. It activates the parasympathetic system. It lowers our blood pressure and calms our mind.”

And, especially when we do so with groups of people (sankirtana). Think about singing at places of worship, or jamming with your friends or family. What’s more, Girish says when you sing in sanga (community of likeminded people), “Our heart beats and brain waves sync up.”

Girish said that freeing the voice is freeing the person. Moreover, “Our voice is a bridge between the inner world and the outer world. Singing and chanting is the best way to bring that forth. It’s not about having an amazing voice. I myself identify as a drummer who sings. Live your life so that when you die, the world cries.”

Girish’s Tips for Singing

  1. Find your key. The majority of women are most comfortable in the key of A. On the other hand, men usually prefer C. 
  2. Relax the jaw, tongue and throat. Try a few lion’s breaths before you start to sing. 
  3. The dan tien (a few fingers below the belly) is the root of the voice. In Daoist practices this spot is special. It’s where energy brews. A sea of qi (prana). Similar to with yogic breathing, expand the flower pot, beginning here.

Girish told us that the word voice is related to the word invocation. Both come from the Latin  voxdictionary.com defines invocation as the act of invoking or calling upon a deity, spirit, etc., for aid, protection, inspiration, or the like; supplication. Another definition is a form of prayer invoking God’s presence, especially one said at the beginning of a religious service or public ceremony. So, that can be interpreted as chanting is a form of invoking that connects one with a higher spirit. 

Jaya Lakshmi at Bhakti FestGirish first explored devotional singing when he was in college. There,  he found Kundalini yoga. Then, he deepened his chanting practice when he lived as a monk for five years. He studied Sanskrit and translated many mantras.   Translations are hard, especially from Sanskrit, because there are so many interpretations. About “Om Nama Shivaya,” one of my  ingrained mantras, he makes it simple.  “I honor the inner Self. Shiva. The light of consciousness within me.”

Similarly, Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda are popular singing yogis at Bhakti Fest. 

Jaya Lakshmi acknowledged that Kundalini yoga was the gateway for her devotion. Not surprising, since mantra meditation is very much a part of the Kundalini tradition. Additionally, she said “mantras have such potency.”

Ananda’s Tips for Mantras

“The best mantra to practice is the one you are going to practice. You have to find the joy in it. For me, the Lakshmi mantra is the one I go to. We go through different phases. Whatever makes you a better person. The way is your intuition…your heart.”

One of my favorite recordings of Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda is “Divine Lover’s Maha Mantra.” The maha mantra is widely celebrated. It’s always the grand finale at Bhakti Fest and is the mainstay at Sadhu Sanga and the upcoming festival in Houston. Advaita leads it throughout San Antonio, and beyond. He explains that “maha means great… great mantra for upliftment and restoration of our original loving nature that will swell in your heart more and more, the more you chant.”

 

yoga and meditation for creating health and balance

Yoga Therapy for Creating Health

It’s easy to draw a line between yoga and flexibility, calm and a focused mind. Now that pencil points to yoga therapy for creating health.

Dr. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa has been a yoga practitioner for four decades.  Aside from his personal practice, he’s director of research for the Kundalini Research Institute, research director of the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health, and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. Grounded in data, he had a dream. His vision was to see a conference dedicated to yoga research. 

Now, it’s a reality.  In fact, the International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT) holds two conventions every year. One, the Symposium on Yoga Therapy and Research (SYTAR), is a general membership conference. SYTAR sheds light on research advances, among other things, relevant to yoga therapy schools and therapists. The second, the Symposium on Yoga Research (SYR) is solely about research. SYR disseminates recent research findings, with a focus on opportunities for collaboration and interaction between yoga researchers.

The Stage is Set for Creating Health with Yoga Therapy

yoga and meditation for creating health and balanceToday, there are more than 5,000 IAYT members in 53 countries. I attended the ninth annual SYTAR gathering last month in Newport Beach.  Member practitioners from Australia, the U.K., Japan, China, Denmark, Colombia, India and Puerto Rico attended. Plus, there were hundreds of North Americans, and a large contingency from California.

“We are on the cusp of change,” said Dr. Khalsa. “37 million Americans are practicing yoga. It’s an exponential curve. We are seeing a major transition of yoga into the schools, workplace and health care. Yoga is in 80 hospitals in Sweden.” 

These institutions require evidence-based research, explained Dr. Khalsa. Fortunately, yoga researchers have the facts to prove the benefits of yoga. There is data related to a myriad of conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s prevention to scoliosis to PTSD. 

“Yoga therapy research is exploding. We’re going up in quality and quantity.” When you review the evidence-based data, it’s a no-brainer.

“Application of yoga therapy is always beneficial as an adjunct therapy as it can improve stress, mood and quality of life in patients.  In some disorders such as insomnia, it may be reasonably considered as an efficacious first-line treatment,” suggested Dr. Khalsa. Not surprisingly, “Twice as many yoga practitioners claim they have better health (than non-yoga followers), and yogis use less meds —and cigarettes, and exercise more.”

Yoga As A Way of Life

yoga and meditation for creating health and balanceHowever, what many don’t realize is that yoga is a way of life. Hence, yoga therapy, for me, is lifestyle management. 

While I’ve been practicing yoga most my life, I amped up my practice as I got older.

For me, it was about creating health. Today, I’m at my lowest post-adolescent weight. Plus, chronic back pain and digestive disorders are rarely a nuisance. More importantly, as a 60-year-old diabetic, I take zero allopathic meds. As I deepened my yoga practice, I scrubbed up my already healthy yogic (vegetarian, alcohol- and caffeine-free) lifestyle. Goodbye dairy and gluten.  Now, I follow an Ayurvedic dinacharya for creating health. I have work/life balance. Moreover, I’ve found physical, energetic, emotional, and spiritual balance.

Burnout is a major problem in our society. We want more, more, more, and work, work, work. That doesn’t jive with yogic ways.

“We see essentially a rat race,” said Dr. Khalsa. “We need to be able to change our life meaning and purpose. Modern medicine is incapable of doing this.” Our current system is “disease care, not health care,” he asserts. 

Research Supports Benefits of Yoga and Creating Health

sat Bir khalsa-principles-and-practice-of-yoga-in-health-careAs mentioned in his books, “Your Brain on Yoga, A Harvard Medical School Guide,” and “The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care,” Khalsa points to compelling scientific evidence. Yoga and meditation can change our brains, and our lives. Yoga is a stress buster and a positive mental attitude booster. 

Research done in conjunction with Austin’s Yoga Yoga confirmed that yoga minimizes stress.  Furthermore, studies of young musicians at Tanglewood found that after just six weeks of a yoga practice, they were more “in the zone” and had increases in mindfulness and the flow state and improvements in mood.  

Mindfulness is a buzz word now. So is organics. Yet, the vast majority of Americans still don’t get with the program. Not surprisingly, non-communicable diseases, many of which are stress-induced or stress-aggravated, are at all at time high. The United States is tops in obesity. 

“Modern medicine does not emphasize self-regulation, self-care, or mind-body awareness (which yoga does). The public expects immediate gratification and that’s a problem. Patients don’t feel they have to do anything. We are spending more, and are less healthy. The only strategies doctors use are fear.” 

Fortunately, the bell tide is starting to turn. Dr. Dean Ornish conducted research in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for 16 years. In 2010, Medicare began to reimburse costs for Ornish’s lifestyle-based program. So, in essence, Medicare recognized yoga therapy for heart disease.

Dr. Khalsa is in tune with Dr. Ornish, who wrote the forward to Khalsa’s “The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care.” Change must be from the bottom up, both in respect to wellness, and our failing medical system. 

Change Agents Creating Health

yoga and meditation for creating health and balanceLikewise, John Weeks, editor of the Journal of Complementary Medicine lectured at SYTAR. Weeks acknowledged one of the problems with healthcare in our society is that wellness does not incentivize.

That said, he agreed that mainstream medicine is getting the hint. Weeks referred to Donald Berwick, the former administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In fact, Berwick has openly stated we need change agents. The Harvard-trained pediatrician, influenced by Jon Kabat Zinn and Dr. Ornish, has fought relentlessly to improve the state of health care. Consequently, his takeaway is that we must create health. 

Similarly, in The Huffington Post, Weeks mentioned a survey among health care professionals.  Namely, 84 percent agreed that “Complementary and alternative medicine is a tool of our deeper mission of transformation which will only be successful if we help birth in the U.S. a thriving industry of health creation.”

In conclusion, Weeks says, “A huge door to such a transformation is swinging open.” 

Healing Body, Mind and Soul: Yoga for Grief

 

Antonio Sausys is a somatic psychotherapist and a yoga therapist. He specializes in yoga for grief relief. Like many of us, he found his path into yoga, and yoga therapy, as a way to heal himself. 

When he was 19 years old, his mother had a stroke and passed away. She was only 54 years old.  He didn’t allow himself to grieve naturally.

“Every time the grief would come, I’d switch it off,” he says.

One day, he was traveling in the Pampas of Argentina.  His foot hurt, and he was diagnosed with a bone spur.  His doctor insisted that the spur was a result of a physical trauma.   

Yet, “I didn’t have any accident. What I did understand was that my body created this thing to say ‘hey, take care of your heart.’”

Yoga for grief

As a result, he began a yoga practice to cure his heel — and his heart. Yoga for grief.  It was intuitive. To this day, he pulls from that inner wisdom. His approach to yoga for grief relief is very powerful work. He incorporates pranayama (breathwork), movement therapy including pavanmuktasana (joint freeing) and sankalpas (affirmation/pledges). 

“I knew exactly what I needed. Now I know that yoga is within all of us. It’s not what we practice Mondays at 6:15 pm.” 

However, culture often dictates how we respond to death. Moreover, how we grieve people’s passing.  The traditional response mechanisms can vary significantly from one religion, country or society to another. That said, the grieving process is not always short, or simple. Plus, grieving is far more about loss of a loved one. 

At a recent workshop on yoga for grief, Sausys talked about myths associated with the pain of grieving. Below, are summaries.

Myth #1:  Grief only appears when someone dies. 

Wrong. First, grief can be loss of identity. Or, it can be a result of an abusive step father. Actually, the loss doesn’t have to be a loved one. Loss of health, hair, eyesight, job, limb, expectations, hope, innocence, safety, ideals, relationships, dreams, youth, status or independence all can trigger grieving.

Furthermore, there are primary and secondary losses. Sausys says that the secodary loss can often be more difficult to overcome. It may be easier to grieve and heal from the loss of a parent or spouse. But, the secondary losses, i.e., divorce, home, friends, status, family, are a lot more prevailing.

“New grief triggers old grief. Other people’s grief triggers our own.” As an example, he says that current events can ramp up a grieving pattern. 

Myth #2: Grief is purely emotional. 

Next, there are many emotions that arise during the grieving, or lack of grieving, process. “Sadness is not the only feeling. Guilt. Anger. Fatigue. Social isolation,” he explains.  Sometimes, grief leads to the end, or beginning, of a spiritual journey. On a physical level, our bodies respond. For example, one may be hunched over to protect the heart.

“We create body armor,” he says. Grieving is “physical, mental, social, behavioral and spiritual. There are few illnesses that present this many symptoms.”

Myth #3: Grief is the price we pay for love

Thirdly, what causes grief is attachment. Interestingly enough, yoga teaches one to seek detachment. Namely, Asteya. Aparigraha. Santosha.

“We identify our selves with our attachments. Therefore we are no longer who we are. Re-identification is needed via self knowledge. What better than yoga to find who we really are.”

“For yoga, love is what is left after you’ve let go of everything you love. Anahatha (the heart chakra) has two chords: love and attachment. Positive and negative. In the west, love is attachment. We are hard-wired for attachment. Not so in east.”

Myth #4: Grief is short-lived. 

yoga for griefIn closing, Sausys says we don’t get over grief, just our relationship with it. Plus, our society doesn’t make it easy to grieve, naturally.

“Grievers need to be heard. We don’t have outlets to talk about grief. In a way, we are all candidates for grief burnout.”

Note: Sausys is based out of northern California. He has retreats and workshops scheduled for later this year in Canada, Chicago, Massachusetts and the Bahamas –at one of my alma maters, Sivananda.  Learn more about therapeutic yoga for grief, PTSD, or other emotional or physical needs. Visit my Contact page. 

extra-terrestrial yogis at Contact in the Desert

Celestial Yogis Make Contact in the Desert

Recently, I was invited to Contact in the Desert. This is the largest UFO gathering in the States. While I didn’t catch any flying saucers, I found some celestial yogis.

Laura Eisenhower

Laura Eisenhower She looks like yogis do. She has natural curls, nose ring and loose fitting natural fiber clothes. Laura’s on the lineup for a June 17 Mass Meditation Initiative in Los Angeles. The goal is to “raise the vibration of humanity and bring forth higher consciousness on planet earth together.” 

Although she’s steeped into UFOlogy, and claims to have had some close encounters of her own, she speaks like a yogi. “We are here to be amazing vessels of creativity…help others through experience of being wounded. There’s got to be something else besides wounds.” 

It’s clear she has mastered mindfulness. In my book, that’s more important than landing your side crow. The great-granddaughter of Ike, her father runs wilderness expeditions. It’s apparent that Laura picked up his love for the elements in our universe.  

stress reduction workshop“I’m blown away by nature.  Looking at nature is like a psychedelic experience.  I have to remind myself, this is what it’s all about,” she said. “We are so connected to this earth. The energy of the mother is unconditional love. The ultimate wound is separation from the mother.”

In Sanskrit, mother is ma.  I interpret ma to mean my birth mother, the divine mother, mother nature, or womankind. 

In a prior interview, Laura spoke about that.  “The Mother energy loves us beyond our comprehension, and is patient and determined to create global transformation, regenerate and re-unite with Heaven, through the cycles of nature and the path of Venus.”

“It’s not easy being human. Just to observe, in a week, all the things in your life, out of balance. Defeat is just a choice. You go though a lot… either becoming a victim and evil, or, help others…have each others’ back.”

Like many yogis, she has traipsed all over the world.  Steeped in frontier health, alchemy, metaphysics and ancient history, she has degrees and certifications in science, wilderness expedition leadership and natural healing. 

Robert Bauval

Robert Bauval at Contact in the DesertAn Egyptologist for 30 years, Robert Bauval is author of more than a dozen books. His latest is “Cosmic Womb: The Seeding of Planet Earth.” The founder of Astrobiology, Chandra Wikramasinghe, PhD. co-authored that edition.

Most relevant, Bauval broaches subjects popular among yogis. Consciousness, and the afterlife. 

“In all honesty, no one really knows what consciousness is.  That’s what makes it exciting.  Something is physical, and yet it’s not. Consciousness is what happens when you wake up. When I’m at that stage of waking up.” He told workshop attendees that it can feel like a buzz, or something electric turning on. Our traditional consciousness is very dull. Rather, turned on just four percent. “That’s where it gets spooky. As far as we know, we are the only conscious beings in the universe. Our level of awareness and consciousness is extraordinary.”

Actually, his theory is that we are the product of a much more ancient life form. “Maybe there’s more between the stars and the pyramids.  Life was brought here by meteorites some 3.5 billion years ago.  The probability for life having evolved HERE is almost nil. I’m beginning to think we are aliens.”

Amrit Kirtan Kaur

Amrit Kaur at Contact in the Desert When I saw the name, I knew she was part of the family of yogis. In the Sikh tradition, we are all equal. A woman does not “belong” to a man. Hence, all females take on the same surname: Kaur = princess. Amrit means sweetness, or nectar. Finally, Kirtan is devotional chanting. 

On one evening, she led beautiful mantra meditations in Gurmukhi (language of the Sikhs) and English. The following morning, she was on stage with her electric keyboard, explaining the healing effects of chanting.  

I have great respect for Kundalini as taught by Yogi Bhajan. His teachings are wise forms of therapy. Yogi Bhajan was a disciple of Guru Ram Das who was a healer. Guru Ram Das sent Yogi Bhajan to the West. According to Amrit, he came to the United States in 1969. One of his missions was to help get people off drugs. 

“Happiness is our birthright,” said Amrit. “It’s the blessing that we have. You can share it with everybody. With yourself. And God.”

“What is music?” she asked. “Vibration. It’s infinite. It’s everywhere. We are vibration. You are the instrument. When we sing we feel better. I am definitely one that has been a guinea pig to my own experiences.  I have been changed by the mantras,” she confessed. 

hatha at Contact in the DesertMe too. I chant every day, and just returned from a retreat where we chanted three words, almost 12 hours a day. I’m looking forward to repeat that retreat next year.

“The power of mantra, when you chant, you connect with the meridians in the mouth,” she explained. “It’s a beautiful marriage: prayer and mantra. When you tap into your voice, you tap into what’s there. Like a whole closet. Full of things you never knew you had there.”

Most noteworthy, Amrit equates different chords with different chakras. This approach is similar to Dr. Dream with his Tibetan bowls.  For example, the root chakra is C. Likewise, the second chakra is D which boosts creativity and minimizes fear. 

Sunrise Hatha

Finally, yogis could unite for asana practice. This is California. What would sunrise be without a sun salutation.

Ayurvedic practices of abhyanga and sneha

Laura Plumb On Sneha: Self-Care with Oils

I’ve always hated perfume. My mom used to buy cheap “toilet water” and douse the toilet with it. With my keen sense of smell, I retreat when someone laden with perfume is near me. On the other hand, I relish the scents of aromatherapy and natural oils (like coconut). They feel nurturing and nourishing to me. That’s why I’m a fan of the Ayurvedic practices of sneha and abhyanga.

Sneha and Abhyanga

Sneha, and abhyanga, are Ayurvedic methods of massage. At last month’s Shakti Fest , I gravitated to two of Laura Plumb‘s workshops. One was a hands-on sneha session. We anointed ourselves, or others, with oils. She passed around her home-made sneha mixtures. She shared tips for selecting essential oils, herbs and spices.

Laura explained that the word sneha means both oil, and love. Likewise, I was taught abhyanga is self-care, to nurture love of self.

The Nityananda Times explains, “Abhyanga comes from two words, ‘abhi’ and ‘anga’, meaning gentle movements over body parts. Like the experience of being loved, abhyanga can give a deep feeling of stability and warmth. Sneha is subtle; this allows the oil/love to pass through minute channels in the body and penetrate deep layers of tissue.”

sneha, abhyanga and essential oilsLaura told us, “To caress the body is a form of love. Not only is your skin going to get better, but at the deepest level, who you are you can be restored. There’s nothing wrong with you. Love is the healer.” We are all capable of self-healing, and are natural born healers. In Laura’s words, “You are the infinite…the light of the divine.” 

Sneha, and abhyanga are Ancient healing practices. The sages respected our planet’s energies essential for well being. For example, Ayurveda teaches us that faux foods and lab-made pills are not sattvic (calming/harmonious). Rather, one should look to nature for nutrition and optimizing wellness. 

Consider, Frankincense and myrrh were gifts of the Three Wise Men. Laura quoted Jesus, “Take down the best of our oils.” 

“Oil is thicker than water. Oil is everywhere. Internally and externally,” she explained. Therefore, sneha frequently. My Ayurvedic schooling urged daily oiling of hair, body and mouth. Nowadays, oil is getting its due respect. Even my dentist endorses “oil pulling.”

Personalized Sneha and Abhyanga

sneha, abhyanga and essential oilsIt should be noted that Ayurveda prescribes different oils, depending on one’s dosha.  For example, I offset my cold/dry vata tendencies with sesame oil. That’s because sesame is considering heating, whereas coconut oil is better suited for  hotter pitta types.

Additionally, one’s constitution changes throughout the day, season, and lifespan. Pre-adolescents tend to be in kapha (growth) cycles. Conversely, mature people are in their vata (air/ether) days. Hence, I learned in India that dry massage (with triphala) is an option for oilier kapha people, or seasons. But, as we age, we require more oil, internally and externally.

“After 40, it’s oleation, oleation, oleation.” Sesame oil is full of anti-oxidants and is an anti-inflammatory, Laura said. That makes it very good, even for for Alzheimer’s. The oil penetrates the skin, into the brain. Not surprisingly, another form of Indian massage is champi.  This traditional head massage gave way shampoo.

Speaking of which, I make my own. My essential oils are part of all my personal care products. No toxic ingredients. And, mine smell great, and do my body — and hair— good. Essential oils have multiple benefits. In fact, geranium, rosemary, citronella and eucalyptus, repel insects. 

Which essential oils are best for you? That depends on your constitution. 

First of all, vata types should use sesame oil as the carrier. Pitta (warm-natured) people do better with coconut or sunflower oil. Because sesame is anti-inflammatory, it’s the preferred oil for kapha.  Laura recommended any flowers and sandalwood for pitta. For vata, lavender (which I use nightly), rose or geranium (two other of my favorites). Other options: clary sage or jatamansi (which my Ayurvedic doctor prescribed for me).  Frankincense, which is considered good for everything, is suggested for the joints. Furthermore, brahmi is cooling, and beneficial to the nervous system.  

Under the Moonlight

Ayurvedic practices of abhyanga and snehaAs a student of Vedic astrology, Laura suggested mixing oils in a glass jar, on a full moon. Then, let the moon “bathe” the oils, outside. Actually, that’s how I treated my crystals recently.  

Speaking of gem stones, Laura says pearls are best during a moon period, versus rubies in a sun period. The sun is connected to the heart, or atma (soul).

Consequently, in a full moon, your true self shines. Creativity is a key word here. On the other hand, during a waning moon, one has less energy.  This is a time for going inward.  Reflection.

From another perspective, the moon is maternal. However, Venus is the sister, or princess, reflective of beauty, arts and all that inspires.

Vedic astrology, she said, is a moon-based system that shows us patterns in the universe. It takes the judgement out, but puts back responsibility, and gives us remedies. In a sense, it is the understanding of self.  “Each planet is like a deity.”  Goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswati are personifications of Venus. 

Similarly, from the Yin/Yang perspective, the moon is yin. Rather, yin is cooling and feminine. The sun is yang: masculine and hot.  Read more of my articles about the Yin Yoga and Ayurveda, or check out Laura’s tips.

International Day of Yoga 2017

International Day of Yoga 2017 — Many Days, Not One

International Day of Yoga 2017 India 

International-Yoga-Day-CelebrationA few years ago, India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi made an appeal at the United Nations. As a result, 177 United Nations member states assigned June 21 as a day to recognize the benefits of yoga. International Day of Yoga 2017 will be celebrated around the world. Now, tens of thousands convene for mass meditations and sun salutations. 

For International Day of Yoga 2017, India’s Prime Minister, senior officials and yoga gurus are expected to lead more than 50,000 people in Lucknow, India.  Nearly a dozen events will take place in Delhi. One, in Red Fort, can accommodate 50,000.  In Southern India, venues even include a women’s correctional facility. 

Prime Minister Modi is a man who respects the ancient traditions, while moving forward. In a Facebook video he posted this week, he talked about the benefits of yoga on society.  “People want to live a happy life, and this can be possible only through yoga.” Yoga can make it possible for a person to have a balanced lifestyle mentally and physically, he explained. “Yoga can arouse the inner conscience of a person.”

International Day of Yoga 2017 New York

swami-sivanandaWhile cities around the world honor this day with special public yoga and meditation practices, the UN will host two days of activities. The Indian Mission to the United Nations is responsible for the impressive lineup June 20 and 21.

Among the yogis are California-based Seane Corn, Sharon Gannon of New York City’s Jivamukti Yoga and Gurmukh, who popularized Kundalini Yoga in Los Angeles.  Also on the lineup is Swami Sivadasananda, a senior teacher of Sivananda Yoga (my yoga roots). His session, expected to attract 1,500 participants, will be televised in India.

Other guests are spiritual leaders from India. President of Divine Shakti Foundation, Sadhvi Bhagawatiji, and H.H. Pujya Swami Chidanand Saraswatiji, who runs an ashram, both reside in Rishikesh. 

Additionally, there will be discussion on Yoga and Health with World Health Organization officials, Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D and others. Finally, there will be pranayama, meditation and chanting. Grammy nominated Jai Uttal will lead thousands with his eclectic world rhythms.  

Shout it Out: The Yoga of Chanting

Jai Uttal to lead kirtan at International Day of Yoga 2017

Jai humbly, said, “Finally, after well over 5,000 years, yoga has made it into the modern calendar. International Day of Yoga is a celebration of the dedication and commitment of countless seekers, from time immemorial, who have discovered and then shared the path of healing and realization that is yoga. Starting in the West as a fad, the many styles and forms of yoga (and there ARE many) have become a healing balm to our hearts and souls in these troubled times. I bow in gratitude to the United Nations for acknowledging this ancient and sacred wisdom.”

The event coincides with Jai’s tour promoting his 19th album Roots! Rock! Rama! Named for Bob Marley’s “Roots Rock Reggae,” Jai’s three Rs celebrate Rama (God), reggae and classic Indian ragas. As an extension of his new double CD, Jai released a single, “H.E.L.P.” for International Day of Yoga. 

“We hear all the translations and interpretations of the mantras. But to me,” Jai said, “they’re all saying ‘Help!’ You know? Like, ‘God, help me. I cannot take the next step without your help.’”

California-based Jai returns to New York where he was raised.  His father was influential in the music industry in the 50s and 60s. So,  Jai picked up an  appreciation for the Beatles, Marley and other rock luminaries. Then, in the 70s he studied traditional Indian music. In India, he began his bhakti (devotional) yoga practice. As such, kirtan became the center of Jai’s musical and spiritual life. 

International Day of Yoga 2017 in Texas 

downward facing dog with The Namaste Counsel

Multiple Texas events will honor this day. Following, are just a few.

  • San Antonio:

International Day of Yoga 2017 at Tripoint Event Center. A free family-friendly festival runs alongside a CME-accredited conference for health practitioners. 

  • Austin:

The Indian Consulate is hosting a celebration June 17 at the State Capitol.

  • Greater Houston:  

June 24, the Hindu Temple of Woodlands will be at Town Green Park leading bhajans (songs), meditation and hatha yoga.

  • Dallas/Fort Worth: 

The official International Day of Yoga 2017 event is June 25 at Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Plaza in Irving. Yoga mats will be provided, and breakfast served.

kapalabhati ego eradicator breath of fire

YOGA MEDICINE: Focus for International Day of Yoga

Tiffany Cruikshank is the founder of Yoga Medicine and author of two books. With a Masters in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, she combines the wisdom of east and west to help her clients achieve optimum health and wellness. At one of her yoga workshops in Austin, she said, “I feel strongly that yoga belongs in our medical system. My patients who were yoga students, got better, faster.”

So many others in the health care fields share this message.

Both Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Ayurveda, seek to find the root cause for imbalances which can cause dis-ease. About TCM, Kruikshank spoke about the over riding principles. “In a simple way, we treat the wholeBrahmari Yoga Medicine person…the root of what’s happening and symptoms,” which she referred to as the leaves and branches. “The body knows what to do to heal itself.” And, she added that healthy bodies have a natural flow. Call it chi or prana, it’s the energetic life force.

Another yoga therapist who combines the best of east and west is Dr. Saraswati Markus who leads Dao Flow Yoga/TCM Teacher Trainings.  An ob/gyn, and acupuncturist, she “weaves together Chinese medicine, and Yoga, along with modern medicine, into one healing cord.” She seeks to find the root cause of the problem and a lifetime solution. She says you can “use the body as a tool.  Balance (yin/yang) becomes a game changer.”  And, it’s too often missing. Especially, when you consider that 70 percent of people’s issues are stress related. 

“We are wired to see our environment as a problem,” said Dr. Markus. “The sympathetic nervous system is being toggled on.”  And, females seem to carry a bigger burden. “Women are natural multi-taskers. Most of us are very goal-oriented.”  Following what she calls the disease of perfectionism, with no balance, things get out of whack. “We have to be very careful. Doing one thing at a time conserves your vital life force.”

The Namaste Counsel Yoga MedicineExplained from a Western medical reference, Dr. Markus says that the endocrine system shuts down as a result of a hectic overburdened lifestyle. “Every time we break harmony, it leads a little bit of residue.”

For some, it’s easier to stay in harmony. For others, the slightest upset can wreak havoc on their body and cause pain. I’m very easy going. But, I have dealt with stress-related discomfort most my life. Fortunately, I turned to yoga and meditation for pain management when I was a teen. Now, nearing my 60th birthday, I take no prescription or OTC drugs. However, I reach for my different forms of yoga medicine upon rising, before bedtime, and throughout the day.

My personal experiences are what led me to be a Certified Yoga Therapist. I believe in teaching people about yoga medicine whenever possible.

One of my clients was a vet with a barrage of injuries and insurmountable pain. With the support of bolsters and cushions, he was able to relax his mind and body in key poses, and practice mindfulness and breath work. He experienced a significant reduction in discomfort, improved energy and sleep. That led to an overall improved state of being.

Learn More as Part of International Day of Yoga

Lawrence M. Cohen, MD, says that, “Pain represents an area of inflammation and ‘stuck energy.’ By doing stretches, applying sound eating practices and using diaphragmatic breathing, both the causes of pain and the perception of pain can be lowered.” Cohen is medical director of The Center for Complementary Medicine in San Antonio. He will discuss Yoga as Lifestyle Medicine at a free International Day of Yoga event at TriPoint June 17. 

Yoga therapy, Ayurveda and TCM are individual rather than one-size-fits-all prescriptions.   There is no handy Rx reference sheet for practitioners. Hence, client/practitioner relationships are important. For example, I try to do lifestyle as well as postural and musculo-skeletal analyses. Then, seek root issues, and how to address them. 

bhastrika yoga medicineDr. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa has conducted ions of clinical research. For decades he has studied the efficacy of yoga medicine for Alzheimer’s, back pain and a host of other disorders. I’ve attended workshops he’s led for yoga therapists in California. Now, he’s headed to San Antonio.  For International Day of Yoga, Dr. Khalsa will lead a CME-Seminar for physicians, students and healthcare professionals. 

As is my preference, he endorses the many limbs of yoga. “Yoga practices that include all of the traditional components including breath regulations, deep relaxation and meditation/mindfulness in addition to physical postures and exercises are behavioral strategies that have a significant psychophysiological impact on physical and mental fitness,” he explains.

Traditional Chinese Medicine, Yoga, Ayurveda and other mind/body practices focus on balance and wellness. Dr. Devraj Nayak is a cardiologist in Floresville, Texas. As an advisory board member of the upcoming Yoga as Lifestyle Medicine event, he quotes from Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra Chapter 2 Verse 16.

The pain and suffering which is not yet come can and is to be avoided.

Finally, for some of my favorite forms of yoga medicine, check out my photo gallery that includes benefits and instructions. 

Bhakti Fest 2015

Boost Your Bhakti at Shakti Fest

Yoga is everywhere in the United States. You can even buy your blocks and mat at any big box store.

But the yoga that is so prevalent tends to be the physical component.  In fact, yoga is eight-limbed. Some of those branches may seem a bit obscure. Others, out of reach. However, it’s easy climbing. Especially if there’s a spotlight on them. Add in mega-stages and throngs of people loving their spirituality and you’re on your way. That’s Bhakti Fest.

Bhakti and Shakti Fest

puja ceremony at Bhakti FestThe guy who brought Swami Satchidananda to Woodstock created Bhakti Fest, and its sister, Shakti Fest. 

Shakti (divine energy) Fest is just around the corner.  Set for May 12-14, I booked my airfare last month. The next Bhakti (devotion) is in September. Both have a similar vibe to what I can only imagine was at Woodstock. But, on a much smaller scale. And, following yoga tenets: no drugs, alcohol or meat. As a result, people from all over head to Joshua Tree, California, for these festivals. I’ve made it a priority for many years.  It’s my fix. It’s powerful professional development. And, permanent personal development.

The festivals are rooted in yoga, Kirtan, and meditation. If you’re not familiar what Kirtan (or Bhakti), read more on my blog

Bhakti and Shakti Fest mesh traditional and non-traditional spiritual practices.  They are a smorgasbord for the yogi. I gorge myself on the music, chanting, and Bhakti yoga practices. Oftentimes, sleeping just a few hours under the desert stars. Unlike an all-you-can-eat buffet, you have to make hard choices. Siva Rea or Mas Vidal? Hemalayaa or Michael Brian Baker? Kia Miller, aerial yoga or the Hanuman Chalisa? There are three concurrent yoga sessions (many with live music). Additionally, there are two stages for devotional music.  Then, there are five workshop areas including a Family Village, a Men’s Lodge and a Women’s Dome. Plus, aquatic yoga, and holistic health practitioners offering massages and more. For those needing to chill, soak up healing sound baths every evening.  

Donna de Lory headlines on Friday. For many years, this spiritual vocalist toured with Madonna. Jai Uttal performs in prime time Saturday. Jai’s latest CD is both Beatles- and Brazilian-inspired. Closing out the night is Joss Jaffe about whom I’ve written in the past. Others include Sheela Bringi, Girish, Sirgun Kaur, Prajna Vieira, Johanna Beekman and Saul David Raye. 

As stated before, these festivals delve into the lesser frequented limbs of yoga. First, there are experts in Vedic astrology and Ayurveda.  Other workshops cover Sanskrit and the deities. Plus, advanced meditation and breath work techniques abound. Finally, for many of the guest speakers, instructors or musicians, the branches intertwine.

From Mantra Meditation to Kirtronica

Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda at Shakti FestFor example Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda are leading three 90-minute yoga sessions. On closing day, they perform on the main stage.  Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda are seeped into meditative Kundalini mantras. Nonetheless, they can switch gear into Kirtronica — Kirtan meets Electronica. As such, their workshops aren’t about a child’s pose or Sun Salutation. The Oregon-based yogi/musicians, with 12 CDs, inspire via waves of movement, breath work and sound.

Ananda Yogiji explains, “My own yoga practice has been heavily influenced by the teaching of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan.  In this practice, there is a quite a fusion of asanas with mantra meditation, bhakti, breath work and more.  In fact, Yogi Bhajan taught kriyas, which oftentimes are a combination of all those things. Almost always the breath is linked with movement and also mantra.” 

“The Bhakti portion really is about your own cultivation for the love of the divine,” he says. “I include that in my practice by singing, bowing to a deity, altar, the omnipresent God without form or simply to my own soul.  I also love making offerings at my altar such as incense, flowers and fruit.  There are so many ways to include these practices not only into your yoga practice but also in your day to day life. Ultimately, Shakti and Bhakti Fest are a super recharge to my devotional practices.  And they just get better and better each year.” 

Deep Dive with Govind Das and Radha

Govind Das and RadhaGovind Das and Radha are another married couple that blend music with mantras and movement. Their music, Bhakti yoga and intensives have made a mark on me. They are the featured band on closing night. Plus, they are offering three yoga sessions infused with their live music. Additionally, Govind Das hosts a men’s workshop and the couple is holding a post-intensive, May 15. The latter includes dialogue, journaling, dharma talks, a silent meditative desert walk, teachings from the great masters, and the philosophy of Kirtan. And, always in their, plenty of music, mantras and heart-opening hatha flow. 

Govind Das says, their intensive is “grounded in a rich and mellow devotional mood of gratitude, compassion, peace, and spiritual upliftment.” Their intensive is actually a satsang, or spiritually uplifting gathering of like-minded people. They motivate participants to reboot Shakti’s vibrancy — and learnings — into their daily lives, 

It’s About Satsang

Satsang and Sangha at Bhakti FestBetty and Bill, are frequent Bhakti Fest-goers. The Canadian engineers created their own Kirtan band, Shanti Maya, fueled by satsang at Bhakti Fest, and elsewhere.

“You can’t say enough about how beneficial it is for the soul to come into the company of dozens, sometimes hundreds, of people who have gathered with the same goal,“ says Betty. 

“I read once that every human culture that has ever existed on our planet had two things in common; they had music, and they sought a connection with the divine,” recalls Betty.  “Devotional music, the musical component of bhakti yoga, is that sweet place where these two most beautiful pieces of our humanity come together.”

meditation and tibetan yogaShe says Kirtan is a major draw.  But, it goes far beyond that. 

“The music itself is blissful, and all the artists have their own unique musical styles that almost always keep us entranced. We all come in common purpose, and that is to feel safe and enriched in one another’s company,” says Betty.  

”Shakti and Bhakti are a place to celebrate the Vedic traditions of India in a modern western setting,” adds Ananda.  “The mixture of chant artists, teachers, and presenters offer participants a wide flavor of teachings for their personal journeys.”