Category Archives: Festivals & Events

Seva_YogaforSight

Seva Unites Yogis Worldwide for the Gift of Sight

Yoga is a very introspective practice. As such, in my personal practice, I tend to keep my eyes closed. In my group classes, when indoors, I lower the lights.  However, imagine going through life in total darkness. As a young child, I remember visiting a relative. He was completely sightless. He lived alone. Within his studio apartment, he could fend for himself. But, I always wondered how he managed beyond his front door. He had no guide dog. No close family or friends. That lasting impression is why I’m endorsing Seva Foundation’s Fifth Annual Yoga for Sight

Yoga for Sight Unites Yogis Worldwide

Seva_YogaforSightMy childhood memories of one blind man’s challenges remain. They have, in part, spurred me to do my own seva (self-less service) for the Berkeley-based Seva Foundation.  The fundraising promotion takes place in April. Around the world, yoga studios and instructors will encourage students to reflect upon the sense of sight. As such, I will be mentioning this worthy charity during my group classes. Additionally, when you book two private sessions* with me, I will donate the full amount of the second class to Seva.

“We tend to take for granted the things that are always there for us, and sight is one of those things,” said Andy Sharkey, Donor Engagement at Seva. “Through yoga we can open up to seeing people’s struggles and understanding them.”

Seva_YogaforSightYoga guides you to connect your body and your mind. It should also teach you to be more respectful and considerate of others. My yoga foundations teach that seva, or karma yoga, is just as important as our breathwork or sun salutations. I try to practice seva in many ways.

For many years, I’ve recognized Seva’s contributions. Since 1978, Seva has worked with local communities to help people live healthier more productive, happy lives. Vision is a precious gift that Seva has given to across the globe.  In fact, Seva, very cost-effectively, has provided critical eye care to 4 million in underserved communities. 

“Nowhere do I know of another group of people who have come so far in their efforts to deliver high quantity, low cost, conscious and compassionate service to their fellow beings,” said Ram Dass, Seva co-founder and honorary lifetime board member.  

Seva_YogaforSightFor example, Seva’s programs have reduced the cost of cataract surgery to just $50, making eye care available to the global poor. Additionally, Seva services include training, technology and techniques for local doctors and community outreach personnel to provide services regardless of one’s ability to pay.

This past year, alone, Seva provided vital eye care services to 1.3 million people in 21 countries. Nearly 70,000 had their eyesight restored, more than 118,000 received medical treatments, and 106,00 received eye glasses.

I invite you to participate in Yoga for Sight with me. Or donate directly. Here are more reasons why your dollar will go so far with Seva.

Seva’s Vision: a World Free of Blindness

  • 36 million people in the world are blind. That number is projected to triple by 2050. Given access to appropriate eye care, 75 percent of them could see again. 
  • Globally, 19 million children are visually impaired or blind. Lack of vision often blocks them from an adequate education and prevents them from escaping poverty. 
  • More than half of sight-impaired people are women and girls. Seva seeks to provide outreach and education, community screenings, transportation, and affordable care to women and girls.
  • Restoring sight is one of the most effective ways to relieve suffering and reduce poverty.
  • The World Bank ranked a 15-minute cataract surgery as one of the most cost-effective health interventions for low and middle income countries.
  • Most eye care treatments change lives right away. 
  • Medication for eye infections prevents decades of blindness and suffering. 
  • Moreover, high-quality eye care creates an immediate and lasting impact.
  • Seva’s long-time partner in India, the Aravind Eye Care System, exemplifies how cost recovery can be turned into financial self-sufficiency. That model is being used around the globe.

seva foundationThere are multiple ways you can contribute.

1) Register for a Yoga for Sight charitable session*, before April 15, with The Namaste Counsel.

2) Find a studio conducting special events for Seva.

3) Donate directly.

Sacred images of Krishna at Blanton Museum of Art

Stories and Images of Krishna for Janmashtami

Krishna’s Birth and Janmashtami 

Images of Krishna and RadhaJanmashtami is an important Vaishnava holiday commemorating the birth of Krishna. A two-day celebration takes place this weekend at Austin’s Radha Madhav Dham temple and gardens. In San Antonio, Krishna communities host events, Sunday. In all, images of Krishna will be venerated. That’s because, according to the ancient texts, Lord Krishna is an incarnation of Vishnu. In fact, the name Krishna, means all attractive. 

Swami Sivananda, in “Bliss Divine” writes, “Vishnu incarnated with lotus eyes, with four hands armed with conch, disc, mace and lotus, with the mark of Srivatsa adorning the chest. Vasudeva (his birth mother) saw this marvel of a divine child.”

“He was the world-teacher,” says Sivananda of Krishna. “Sri Krishna was a perfect Master.  He was a Karma Yogi, Bhakta, Raja Yogi and Jnana Yogi. He preached Karma, Upasana (worship), Yoga and Jnana. The four Yogas are blended in His Gita or the Immortal Song. He was the one Lord of love. His enchanting form, with flute in hand, holds the heart of India captive in chains, even today.”

The Times of India says Lord Krishna was born 5,200 years ago and his birthplace is lit up on Janmashtami. The newspaper refers to the “Bhagavad Gita” to further describe this day.  “…whenever there will be a predominance of evil and decline of religion, Lord Vishnu will reincarnate and save the earth from all that is evil. The main purpose behind the celebration of Janmashtami along with Lord Krishna’s birthday is the prevalence of goodwill and this is what unites people from different regions together on the auspicious occasion.”

Stories Come to Life

images of krishna and garudaThese tales, and more, are depicted in illustrations from a San Diego collection.

Most are based on epics like the Ramayana or Bhagavata Purana.

One area, however, is devoted to Persian-language literature like the Shahnama. Yet another area, is musical illustrations. These are known as Ragamala. Typically, these were sets of 36 paintings, thus, creating a garland (mala) of images pertaining to the music (ragas)

The exhibit is at Austin’s Blanton Museum of Art through October 1.  Epic Tales from Ancient India features stories and images of Krishna. Traditional Indian music is piped into the gallery space. 

There are dozens and dozens of illustrations of Krishna and others from the ancient scriptures in the Blanton exhibit. Images of Krishna, Yashoda, Radha, Balaram are mostly from the 1600s. They tend to be very detailed, tiny stories on paper.

Here are a few examples.

Images of Krishna in Art

birth of KrishnaTo protect Krishna against a terrible prophesy, his birth parents entrusted him to Yashoda and Nanda. Krishna’s birth, and escape from the jail where he was born, are expressed in a watercolor circa 1560.

The exhibit description explains several of the scenes in this piece. 

“When Devaki gives birth to her eight son, Krishna, no ordinary infant, but rather an incarnation of the god Vishnu, a carefully conceived plan ensures the child’s safety.  In this image, the blue-skinned Krishna sits on a lotus throne…At the center, the prison door is left unchained. Its two guards and their dogs have fallen fast asleep, enabling Vasudeva and Krishna’s midnight escape to the distant land where Krishna will be raised.” 

Krishna overcomes BakasuraKamsa sends demons out to harm baby Krishna. One of those demons is disguised as a crane, Bakasura.  

“Bakasura attacked from behind a tree, capturing Krishna in his beak, In the story, the crane swallows Krishna but is forced to expel him when his palate begins to burn…Krishna seizes the two halves of Bakasura’s beak to rip the crane into two pieces as his brother, Balarama, and another cowherd boy wield their sticks to assist in subduing the demon.” 

In another tale, Krishna overcomes a forest fire. After defeating a serpent, Krishna and his father return home. Tired, the fall asleep at the Yamuna river.  

“At this point, a massive forest fire starts, and Krishna must rescue his people again. In the illustration, the fire that encircles the group looks like a garland of yellow flowers, within which Krishna is depicted twice…On the left, he sleeps alongside his brother Balarama and foster father Nanda…On the right, he drinks up the flames…”  

images of krishna and gopisAn opaque watercolor, from the mid 1700s shows Krishna explaining worship. There are multiple stories within the painting, representing how worship is passed on, from one to another. The eye is drawn to a colorful flower. At the yellow center of the flower, are Vishnu and Garuda. His attendants and other deities are pictured on each of the eight pink petals. 

A gallery text explains one of the pieces from around 1690.

“A telling of the story in the vernacular language of Brajbasha on the verso describes Krishna as sitting among the gopis as they together form a circle and enact the rasalila performance. Krishna multiplies himself and dances between the women. Witnessing this wonderful spectacle, gods gather while heavenly musicians and dancers join in the revelry.”

Krishna was ever popular among the gopis (cow herder girls).

“The love that the Gopis bore towards Krishna was a divine love. It was the union of souls,” says Sivananda. He adds that his flute attracted them. “It produced God-intoxication in all beings and infused life even in insentient objects. The sweetness of the music was unsurpassed.”

Epic Tales from Ancient India in Austin

Epic Tales from Ancient IndiaAs part of the Blanton show, there will be a sarod and tabla concert on September 21. Then, on September 22, there will be a lecture. Additionally, each Thursday, Saturday and Sunday will be storytelling and dance. A UT grad student, with then years of Indian classical dance experience, will perform.

The Blanton was founded in 1963 as UT’s Art Museum. Therefore, admission is free to current UT staff and students. Likewise, admission is free for teachers and active military. Typically, the museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays until 5 p.m. However, the third Thursday of every month, the museum is open until 9 p.m.

Ayurvedic practices of abhyanga and sneha

Laura Plumb On Sneha: Self-Care with Oils

I’ve always hated perfume. My mom used to buy cheap “toilet water” and douse the toilet with it. With my keen sense of smell, I retreat when someone laden with perfume is near me. On the other hand, I relish the scents of aromatherapy and natural oils (like coconut). They feel nurturing and nourishing to me. That’s why I’m a fan of the Ayurvedic practices of sneha and abhyanga.

Sneha and Abhyanga

Sneha, and abhyanga, are Ayurvedic methods of massage. At last month’s Shakti Fest , I gravitated to two of Laura Plumb‘s workshops. One was a hands-on sneha session. We anointed ourselves, or others, with oils. She passed around her home-made sneha mixtures. She shared tips for selecting essential oils, herbs and spices.

Laura explained that the word sneha means both oil, and love. Likewise, I was taught abhyanga is self-care, to nurture love of self.

The Nityananda Times explains, “Abhyanga comes from two words, ‘abhi’ and ‘anga’, meaning gentle movements over body parts. Like the experience of being loved, abhyanga can give a deep feeling of stability and warmth. Sneha is subtle; this allows the oil/love to pass through minute channels in the body and penetrate deep layers of tissue.”

sneha, abhyanga and essential oilsLaura told us, “To caress the body is a form of love. Not only is your skin going to get better, but at the deepest level, who you are you can be restored. There’s nothing wrong with you. Love is the healer.” We are all capable of self-healing, and are natural born healers. In Laura’s words, “You are the infinite…the light of the divine.” 

Sneha, and abhyanga are Ancient healing practices. The sages respected our planet’s energies essential for well being. For example, Ayurveda teaches us that faux foods and lab-made pills are not sattvic (calming/harmonious). Rather, one should look to nature for nutrition and optimizing wellness. 

Consider, Frankincense and myrrh were gifts of the Three Wise Men. Laura quoted Jesus, “Take down the best of our oils.” 

“Oil is thicker than water. Oil is everywhere. Internally and externally,” she explained. Therefore, sneha frequently. My Ayurvedic schooling urged daily oiling of hair, body and mouth. Nowadays, oil is getting its due respect. Even my dentist endorses “oil pulling.”

Personalized Sneha and Abhyanga

sneha, abhyanga and essential oilsIt should be noted that Ayurveda prescribes different oils, depending on one’s dosha.  For example, I offset my cold/dry vata tendencies with sesame oil. That’s because sesame is considering heating, whereas coconut oil is better suited for  hotter pitta types.

Additionally, one’s constitution changes throughout the day, season, and lifespan. Pre-adolescents tend to be in kapha (growth) cycles. Conversely, mature people are in their vata (air/ether) days. Hence, I learned in India that dry massage (with triphala) is an option for oilier kapha people, or seasons. But, as we age, we require more oil, internally and externally.

“After 40, it’s oleation, oleation, oleation.” Sesame oil is full of anti-oxidants and is an anti-inflammatory, Laura said. That makes it very good, even for for Alzheimer’s. The oil penetrates the skin, into the brain. Not surprisingly, another form of Indian massage is champi.  This traditional head massage gave way shampoo.

Speaking of which, I make my own. My essential oils are part of all my personal care products. No toxic ingredients. And, mine smell great, and do my body — and hair— good. Essential oils have multiple benefits. In fact, geranium, rosemary, citronella and eucalyptus, repel insects. 

Which essential oils are best for you? That depends on your constitution. 

First of all, vata types should use sesame oil as the carrier. Pitta (warm-natured) people do better with coconut or sunflower oil. Because sesame is anti-inflammatory, it’s the preferred oil for kapha.  Laura recommended any flowers and sandalwood for pitta. For vata, lavender (which I use nightly), rose or geranium (two other of my favorites). Other options: clary sage or jatamansi (which my Ayurvedic doctor prescribed for me).  Frankincense, which is considered good for everything, is suggested for the joints. Furthermore, brahmi is cooling, and beneficial to the nervous system.  

Under the Moonlight

Ayurvedic practices of abhyanga and snehaAs a student of Vedic astrology, Laura suggested mixing oils in a glass jar, on a full moon. Then, let the moon “bathe” the oils, outside. Actually, that’s how I treated my crystals recently.  

Speaking of gem stones, Laura says pearls are best during a moon period, versus rubies in a sun period. The sun is connected to the heart, or atma (soul).

Consequently, in a full moon, your true self shines. Creativity is a key word here. On the other hand, during a waning moon, one has less energy.  This is a time for going inward.  Reflection.

From another perspective, the moon is maternal. However, Venus is the sister, or princess, reflective of beauty, arts and all that inspires.

Vedic astrology, she said, is a moon-based system that shows us patterns in the universe. It takes the judgement out, but puts back responsibility, and gives us remedies. In a sense, it is the understanding of self.  “Each planet is like a deity.”  Goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswati are personifications of Venus. 

Similarly, from the Yin/Yang perspective, the moon is yin. Rather, yin is cooling and feminine. The sun is yang: masculine and hot.  Read more of my articles about the Yin Yoga and Ayurveda, or check out Laura’s tips.

International Day of Yoga 2017

International Day of Yoga 2017 — Many Days, Not One

International Day of Yoga 2017 India 

International-Yoga-Day-CelebrationA few years ago, India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi made an appeal at the United Nations. As a result, 177 United Nations member states assigned June 21 as a day to recognize the benefits of yoga. International Day of Yoga 2017 will be celebrated around the world. Now, tens of thousands convene for mass meditations and sun salutations. 

For International Day of Yoga 2017, India’s Prime Minister, senior officials and yoga gurus are expected to lead more than 50,000 people in Lucknow, India.  Nearly a dozen events will take place in Delhi. One, in Red Fort, can accommodate 50,000.  In Southern India, venues even include a women’s correctional facility. 

Prime Minister Modi is a man who respects the ancient traditions, while moving forward. In a Facebook video he posted this week, he talked about the benefits of yoga on society.  “People want to live a happy life, and this can be possible only through yoga.” Yoga can make it possible for a person to have a balanced lifestyle mentally and physically, he explained. “Yoga can arouse the inner conscience of a person.”

International Day of Yoga 2017 New York

swami-sivanandaWhile cities around the world honor this day with special public yoga and meditation practices, the UN will host two days of activities. The Indian Mission to the United Nations is responsible for the impressive lineup June 20 and 21.

Among the yogis are California-based Seane Corn, Sharon Gannon of New York City’s Jivamukti Yoga and Gurmukh, who popularized Kundalini Yoga in Los Angeles.  Also on the lineup is Swami Sivadasananda, a senior teacher of Sivananda Yoga (my yoga roots). His session, expected to attract 1,500 participants, will be televised in India.

Other guests are spiritual leaders from India. President of Divine Shakti Foundation, Sadhvi Bhagawatiji, and H.H. Pujya Swami Chidanand Saraswatiji, who runs an ashram, both reside in Rishikesh. 

Additionally, there will be discussion on Yoga and Health with World Health Organization officials, Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D and others. Finally, there will be pranayama, meditation and chanting. Grammy nominated Jai Uttal will lead thousands with his eclectic world rhythms.  

Shout it Out: The Yoga of Chanting

Jai Uttal to lead kirtan at International Day of Yoga 2017

Jai humbly, said, “Finally, after well over 5,000 years, yoga has made it into the modern calendar. International Day of Yoga is a celebration of the dedication and commitment of countless seekers, from time immemorial, who have discovered and then shared the path of healing and realization that is yoga. Starting in the West as a fad, the many styles and forms of yoga (and there ARE many) have become a healing balm to our hearts and souls in these troubled times. I bow in gratitude to the United Nations for acknowledging this ancient and sacred wisdom.”

The event coincides with Jai’s tour promoting his 19th album Roots! Rock! Rama! Named for Bob Marley’s “Roots Rock Reggae,” Jai’s three Rs celebrate Rama (God), reggae and classic Indian ragas. As an extension of his new double CD, Jai released a single, “H.E.L.P.” for International Day of Yoga. 

“We hear all the translations and interpretations of the mantras. But to me,” Jai said, “they’re all saying ‘Help!’ You know? Like, ‘God, help me. I cannot take the next step without your help.’”

California-based Jai returns to New York where he was raised.  His father was influential in the music industry in the 50s and 60s. So,  Jai picked up an  appreciation for the Beatles, Marley and other rock luminaries. Then, in the 70s he studied traditional Indian music. In India, he began his bhakti (devotional) yoga practice. As such, kirtan became the center of Jai’s musical and spiritual life. 

International Day of Yoga 2017 in Texas 

downward facing dog with The Namaste Counsel

Multiple Texas events will honor this day. Following, are just a few.

  • San Antonio:

International Day of Yoga 2017 at Tripoint Event Center. A free family-friendly festival runs alongside a CME-accredited conference for health practitioners. 

  • Austin:

The Indian Consulate is hosting a celebration June 17 at the State Capitol.

  • Greater Houston:  

June 24, the Hindu Temple of Woodlands will be at Town Green Park leading bhajans (songs), meditation and hatha yoga.

  • Dallas/Fort Worth: 

The official International Day of Yoga 2017 event is June 25 at Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Plaza in Irving. Yoga mats will be provided, and breakfast served.

kapalabhati ego eradicator breath of fire

YOGA MEDICINE: Focus for International Day of Yoga

Tiffany Cruikshank is the founder of Yoga Medicine and author of two books. With a Masters in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, she combines the wisdom of east and west to help her clients achieve optimum health and wellness. At one of her yoga workshops in Austin, she said, “I feel strongly that yoga belongs in our medical system. My patients who were yoga students, got better, faster.”

So many others in the health care fields share this message.

Both Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Ayurveda, seek to find the root cause for imbalances which can cause dis-ease. About TCM, Kruikshank spoke about the over riding principles. “In a simple way, we treat the wholeBrahmari Yoga Medicine person…the root of what’s happening and symptoms,” which she referred to as the leaves and branches. “The body knows what to do to heal itself.” And, she added that healthy bodies have a natural flow. Call it chi or prana, it’s the energetic life force.

Another yoga therapist who combines the best of east and west is Dr. Saraswati Markus who leads Dao Flow Yoga/TCM Teacher Trainings.  An ob/gyn, and acupuncturist, she “weaves together Chinese medicine, and Yoga, along with modern medicine, into one healing cord.” She seeks to find the root cause of the problem and a lifetime solution. She says you can “use the body as a tool.  Balance (yin/yang) becomes a game changer.”  And, it’s too often missing. Especially, when you consider that 70 percent of people’s issues are stress related. 

“We are wired to see our environment as a problem,” said Dr. Markus. “The sympathetic nervous system is being toggled on.”  And, females seem to carry a bigger burden. “Women are natural multi-taskers. Most of us are very goal-oriented.”  Following what she calls the disease of perfectionism, with no balance, things get out of whack. “We have to be very careful. Doing one thing at a time conserves your vital life force.”

The Namaste Counsel Yoga MedicineExplained from a Western medical reference, Dr. Markus says that the endocrine system shuts down as a result of a hectic overburdened lifestyle. “Every time we break harmony, it leads a little bit of residue.”

For some, it’s easier to stay in harmony. For others, the slightest upset can wreak havoc on their body and cause pain. I’m very easy going. But, I have dealt with stress-related discomfort most my life. Fortunately, I turned to yoga and meditation for pain management when I was a teen. Now, nearing my 60th birthday, I take no prescription or OTC drugs. However, I reach for my different forms of yoga medicine upon rising, before bedtime, and throughout the day.

My personal experiences are what led me to be a Certified Yoga Therapist. I believe in teaching people about yoga medicine whenever possible.

One of my clients was a vet with a barrage of injuries and insurmountable pain. With the support of bolsters and cushions, he was able to relax his mind and body in key poses, and practice mindfulness and breath work. He experienced a significant reduction in discomfort, improved energy and sleep. That led to an overall improved state of being.

Learn More as Part of International Day of Yoga

Lawrence M. Cohen, MD, says that, “Pain represents an area of inflammation and ‘stuck energy.’ By doing stretches, applying sound eating practices and using diaphragmatic breathing, both the causes of pain and the perception of pain can be lowered.” Cohen is medical director of The Center for Complementary Medicine in San Antonio. He will discuss Yoga as Lifestyle Medicine at a free International Day of Yoga event at TriPoint June 17. 

Yoga therapy, Ayurveda and TCM are individual rather than one-size-fits-all prescriptions.   There is no handy Rx reference sheet for practitioners. Hence, client/practitioner relationships are important. For example, I try to do lifestyle as well as postural and musculo-skeletal analyses. Then, seek root issues, and how to address them. 

bhastrika yoga medicineDr. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa has conducted ions of clinical research. For decades he has studied the efficacy of yoga medicine for Alzheimer’s, back pain and a host of other disorders. I’ve attended workshops he’s led for yoga therapists in California. Now, he’s headed to San Antonio.  For International Day of Yoga, Dr. Khalsa will lead a CME-Seminar for physicians, students and healthcare professionals. 

As is my preference, he endorses the many limbs of yoga. “Yoga practices that include all of the traditional components including breath regulations, deep relaxation and meditation/mindfulness in addition to physical postures and exercises are behavioral strategies that have a significant psychophysiological impact on physical and mental fitness,” he explains.

Traditional Chinese Medicine, Yoga, Ayurveda and other mind/body practices focus on balance and wellness. Dr. Devraj Nayak is a cardiologist in Floresville, Texas. As an advisory board member of the upcoming Yoga as Lifestyle Medicine event, he quotes from Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra Chapter 2 Verse 16.

The pain and suffering which is not yet come can and is to be avoided.

Finally, for some of my favorite forms of yoga medicine, check out my photo gallery that includes benefits and instructions. 

Bhakti Fest 2015

Boost Your Bhakti at Shakti Fest

Yoga is everywhere in the United States. You can even buy your blocks and mat at any big box store.

But the yoga that is so prevalent tends to be the physical component.  In fact, yoga is eight-limbed. Some of those branches may seem a bit obscure. Others, out of reach. However, it’s easy climbing. Especially if there’s a spotlight on them. Add in mega-stages and throngs of people loving their spirituality and you’re on your way. That’s Bhakti Fest.

Bhakti and Shakti Fest

puja ceremony at Bhakti FestThe guy who brought Swami Satchidananda to Woodstock created Bhakti Fest, and its sister, Shakti Fest. 

Shakti (divine energy) Fest is just around the corner.  Set for May 12-14, I booked my airfare last month. The next Bhakti (devotion) is in September. Both have a similar vibe to what I can only imagine was at Woodstock. But, on a much smaller scale. And, following yoga tenets: no drugs, alcohol or meat. As a result, people from all over head to Joshua Tree, California, for these festivals. I’ve made it a priority for many years.  It’s my fix. It’s powerful professional development. And, permanent personal development.

The festivals are rooted in yoga, Kirtan, and meditation. If you’re not familiar what Kirtan (or Bhakti), read more on my blog

Bhakti and Shakti Fest mesh traditional and non-traditional spiritual practices.  They are a smorgasbord for the yogi. I gorge myself on the music, chanting, and Bhakti yoga practices. Oftentimes, sleeping just a few hours under the desert stars. Unlike an all-you-can-eat buffet, you have to make hard choices. Siva Rea or Mas Vidal? Hemalayaa or Michael Brian Baker? Kia Miller, aerial yoga or the Hanuman Chalisa? There are three concurrent yoga sessions (many with live music). Additionally, there are two stages for devotional music.  Then, there are five workshop areas including a Family Village, a Men’s Lodge and a Women’s Dome. Plus, aquatic yoga, and holistic health practitioners offering massages and more. For those needing to chill, soak up healing sound baths every evening.  

Donna de Lory headlines on Friday. For many years, this spiritual vocalist toured with Madonna. Jai Uttal performs in prime time Saturday. Jai’s latest CD is both Beatles- and Brazilian-inspired. Closing out the night is Joss Jaffe about whom I’ve written in the past. Others include Sheela Bringi, Girish, Sirgun Kaur, Prajna Vieira, Johanna Beekman and Saul David Raye. 

As stated before, these festivals delve into the lesser frequented limbs of yoga. First, there are experts in Vedic astrology and Ayurveda.  Other workshops cover Sanskrit and the deities. Plus, advanced meditation and breath work techniques abound. Finally, for many of the guest speakers, instructors or musicians, the branches intertwine.

From Mantra Meditation to Kirtronica

Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda at Shakti FestFor example Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda are leading three 90-minute yoga sessions. On closing day, they perform on the main stage.  Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda are seeped into meditative Kundalini mantras. Nonetheless, they can switch gear into Kirtronica — Kirtan meets Electronica. As such, their workshops aren’t about a child’s pose or Sun Salutation. The Oregon-based yogi/musicians, with 12 CDs, inspire via waves of movement, breath work and sound.

Ananda Yogiji explains, “My own yoga practice has been heavily influenced by the teaching of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan.  In this practice, there is a quite a fusion of asanas with mantra meditation, bhakti, breath work and more.  In fact, Yogi Bhajan taught kriyas, which oftentimes are a combination of all those things. Almost always the breath is linked with movement and also mantra.” 

“The Bhakti portion really is about your own cultivation for the love of the divine,” he says. “I include that in my practice by singing, bowing to a deity, altar, the omnipresent God without form or simply to my own soul.  I also love making offerings at my altar such as incense, flowers and fruit.  There are so many ways to include these practices not only into your yoga practice but also in your day to day life. Ultimately, Shakti and Bhakti Fest are a super recharge to my devotional practices.  And they just get better and better each year.” 

Deep Dive with Govind Das and Radha

Govind Das and RadhaGovind Das and Radha are another married couple that blend music with mantras and movement. Their music, Bhakti yoga and intensives have made a mark on me. They are the featured band on closing night. Plus, they are offering three yoga sessions infused with their live music. Additionally, Govind Das hosts a men’s workshop and the couple is holding a post-intensive, May 15. The latter includes dialogue, journaling, dharma talks, a silent meditative desert walk, teachings from the great masters, and the philosophy of Kirtan. And, always in their, plenty of music, mantras and heart-opening hatha flow. 

Govind Das says, their intensive is “grounded in a rich and mellow devotional mood of gratitude, compassion, peace, and spiritual upliftment.” Their intensive is actually a satsang, or spiritually uplifting gathering of like-minded people. They motivate participants to reboot Shakti’s vibrancy — and learnings — into their daily lives, 

It’s About Satsang

Satsang and Sangha at Bhakti FestBetty and Bill, are frequent Bhakti Fest-goers. The Canadian engineers created their own Kirtan band, Shanti Maya, fueled by satsang at Bhakti Fest, and elsewhere.

“You can’t say enough about how beneficial it is for the soul to come into the company of dozens, sometimes hundreds, of people who have gathered with the same goal,“ says Betty. 

“I read once that every human culture that has ever existed on our planet had two things in common; they had music, and they sought a connection with the divine,” recalls Betty.  “Devotional music, the musical component of bhakti yoga, is that sweet place where these two most beautiful pieces of our humanity come together.”

meditation and tibetan yogaShe says Kirtan is a major draw.  But, it goes far beyond that. 

“The music itself is blissful, and all the artists have their own unique musical styles that almost always keep us entranced. We all come in common purpose, and that is to feel safe and enriched in one another’s company,” says Betty.  

”Shakti and Bhakti are a place to celebrate the Vedic traditions of India in a modern western setting,” adds Ananda.  “The mixture of chant artists, teachers, and presenters offer participants a wide flavor of teachings for their personal journeys.”

 

 

Sound therapy and The Namaste Counsel

Sound Therapy in Joshua Tree: From Contact in the Desert to Shakti Fest

 

Dr. Dream and his Tibetan BowlsIn a recent blog, I wrote about Dr. Dream. This is the sound therapy conductor who uses 333 Tibetan bowls. A big fan of sound therapy, I hope to experience the 333 bowl effect next month. Dr. Dream and his team of “angels” will make magical music at Contact in the Desert

Dr. Dream’s bowl sonata will be somewhat of a postlude to a series of nightly sound baths the prior week at Shakti Fest.

Coincidentally, they are all at the same sacred space. The common venue is the very special Joshua Tree Retreat Center, about 40 minutes from the Palm Springs Airport. A not-for-profit center, it is the oldest and largest of its kind, in the Western U.S. It sits on many acres, above an aquifer, with buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, and his son.  Adding to the coincidences, I was born and raised in Frank Lloyd Wright’s hometown, and my brother mowed the lawn at his  studio/home.

Sound Therapy in the Desert

Sound Therapy at Shakti Fest, Joshua Tree CaliforniaSo, for the last five years, I’ve headed to Bhakti Fest without fail. Now, I am headed to Shakti Fest. No typo. S. Not B. Bhakti is held each September.  Shakti Fest is in Springtime.  Actually, May 12-15 this year. Despite the fact that Shakti is a more condensed version than Bhakti, one stage will be dedicated to five hours of sound therapy, nightly. 

Both Bhakti and Shakti Fest bring the best yoga teachers, Kirtan musicians, and workshop leaders to Joshua Tree. Namely, they celebrate the devotional paths of yoga, Kirtan and meditation. Quite a few of the Bhakti/Shakti workshop leaders have influenced my teaching. Many more are staples on my yoga playlists. 

Sridhar Silberfein is the man behind Bhakti and Shakti Fests. Interestingly enough, he was also responsible for getting Swami Satchidananda to Woodstock. So musical extravaganzas and spirituality have been with him most his life.

A sincere bhakta, he has been expanding the festivals to meet the demands of attendees as more and more people head to these festivals. “For years many attendees were asking us for our sound bath programs to be expanded,” Silberfein explains. “For years, we had a small tent where some folks would do gong sessions. Now we have utilized our second stage from 7 p.m. at night to 2 a.m.  Folks can come in, lay down on the carpets, relax, and go into another zone due to the gongs, crystals, and bells surrounding them. It is a very magical environment, and takes each participant into a relaxed, deep, meditative space within.”

Why Sound Therapy?

Sound therapy and The Namaste Counsel As a Certified Yoga Therapist, I have studied many different forms of healing, and try to tap into a colorful palette of modalities when I create lifestyle action plans, homework or protocols for my clients. Sound therapy is most certainly a favorite.

I’m not alone. Dr. Oz is a proponent of sound therapy. On one of his shows, Dr. Oz explained how bi-neural frequencies influence the brain. He displayed brain scans of people listening to crystal sound therapy, to point out the positive effects.

His guest, Dr. Mitchell Gaynor, gave patient testimonials for sound therapy. Gayor is an oncologist, who uses sound in his practice. “It’s critically important,” he responded, saying that it can help everyone. Dr. Gaynor explained that with sonic therapy, you can improve moods and much more. For those that are in good health, it is a proactive measure. For those battling health issues, the differences are more evident. As an oncologist, he incorporated a 15-minute crystal sonic therapy session into his patients’ first visits. Apparently, it was highly effective. Many said they hadn’t felt that relaxed, ever. For Dr. Gaynor, this was especially rewarding. Especially, considering the first visit to an oncologist is often filled with fear and anguish.

Shakti Fest Sound Therapy Lineup 

Bhakti Fest, Joshua Tree, California

Ten different Sound Dome presenters are part of the extended Shakti lineup. Among them is Danny Goldberg.  His Sound Immersion Experience “weaves the restorative vibrations of singing bowls, gongs and chimes to create a blanket of healing sounds. The sound provides a channel for release, opening and transformation; tuning our vibrational frequency.”  In the past, Danny led healing sessions at Wanderlust, Lightning in a Bottle, Lucidity, UC Santa Cruz and Foothill College Music Programs.  

Guy Douglas is a sound therapy practitioner with a longtime interest in the healing power of music. A traveling gongmaster, he performs Sound Circle Ceremonies, Group SoundBaths, Retreats, Gong Workshops, Gong Yoga Flow classes and Gong Invocations. His focus is Eastern sound healing techniques that help clear dormant pathways and open the heart. 

Michelle Berc and her healing bowls and Shakti FestLynda Arnold is a healing sound recording artist and certified sound healer. She taps into the power of sound therapy to help people reduce stress, and transform consciousness.  Lynda was a Sound, Voice and Music Healing student at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. Additionally, she studied Tibetan Bowl Sound Healing with master practitioner and educator Suren Shrestha.

Michelle Berc has performed at Bhakti/Shakti fest in the past. She focuses on chakra balancing with Crystal and Tibetan singing bowls, percussion instruments, gong, tuning forks, and other rare instruments. She explains that “sonic experience allows you to; release blocked energy in the body, balance and align the chakra centers for greater energy flow, and elevate your holistic being for expanded awareness. Overall, a vibrational kinship between mind, body, and spirit will take place.” 

She holds a certification from the Sound and Consciousness Institute in San Francisco. 

(As a matter of full disclosure, Bhakti Fest has, at times provided me with complimentary admission. However, that does not in any way affect the content of my blogs.)

Shadows of the Sun Dynasty by Vrinda Sheth

Sita’s Fire: Trilogy Unveiled at Austin Performance

When Vrinda Sheth was 18 years old, an opportunity fell into her lap. Most would have run the other way. Or laughed it off. She toughened up to the challenge. She spent the next 15 years honing her talents, as part of “Sita’s Fire.”

This week, the object of her immense dedication won a prestigious award. “Shadows of Destiny,” was bestowed a Silver Medal by the Independent Book Publishers Association. One of the most influential associations in independent publishing, IBPA awards recognize excellence in book editorial and design.

Book Reading Performance in Austin

Vrinda Sheth, author of Shadows of the Sun DynastyVrinda lives in Central Florida with her husband, Vish.  He’s a kirtan artist about whom I’ve written many an article. April 21, they will perform their mesmerizing and invigorating blend of East vs. West music and dance at Austin’s Sanctuary Church. The visit is to promote what has kept Vrinda on the creative track all these years.  Not just one book. But three.  “Sita’s Fire” Trilogy.  All are published by Mandala/Simon and Schuster,

Well-known yogi, Shiva Rea says Vrinda is an “extraordinarily gifted storyteller” who makes the timeless epic come to life.

Vrinda explains how everything fell into place. 

Annapurna Johansson, Sita's Fire“This project began as a vision by my mother, who is the illustrator. As long as I can remember, she has been fiercely committed to her art, setting up studios for herself even with the most minimal of resources. She began her first Ramayana drawings over 15 years ago and was working with another author. That project came to a halt as that author dropped out. Determined, my mom asked me if I’d like to try my hand at writing. Her request really surprised me, as I was 18 at the time, about to start college, and with no clear idea of my direction. But the publishers loved the draft I wrote and that was the beginning of this joint mom-daughter work.”

The Trilogy: Sita’s Fire

Shadows of the Sun Dynasty by Vrinda ShethVrinda began “Shadows of the Sun Dynasty” from Internet cafes in India.  As she was writing the Sita’s Fire trilogy, she earned a degree in English from the University of Florida. She married Vish. They had a baby, and are expecting their second child this July. Now, she has gained confidence as a prolific writer. “Queen of the Elements” will be available August 8. Then, the third in the series will be released in 2019.  She acknowledges mom was always right.

“I think in some ways she knew me better than I knew myself, because her request really compelled me to start my creative journey as an author. In hindsight, I can see that my mom encouraged me in this direction, because I was always writing something or the other and an avid reader. It took more than 10 years for me to settle into my confidence as a writer, and that journey will perhaps continue lifelong. But I’ve at least grown past paralyzingly self-doubt into a mature ability to even critique and edit my own work.”

Vrinda’s mother, Anna Johansson, exposed Vrinda to the ancient tales of the Ramayana at an early age. Rather than tales of Mickey and Cinderella, her parents raised Vrinda according to Vedic cultures and traditions. Stories of Sita and Rama. She learned Sanskrit and basic Hindi.  For five years, she lived in India. She mastered  traditional Indian dance which guests will appreciate in Austin.  

“It is my personal aim to make these ancient Indian stories accessible to ‘my own people,’ in the sense that I grew up in the West, first Sweden and then America, and I’m quite rooted in the United States. I was raised on these incredible Indian epics from various ancient texts. Good stories are good stories. And we are all hungry for them, no matter where on earth they come from.”

Vrinda and Vish make sacred traditional music hip. Likewise, she hopes to be a cultural translator of the tales from India that date back to fifth century BCE.

The Ramayana is an Epic Tale

Vrinda Sheth, author of Shadows of the Sun Dynasty“The Ramayana is a complex, multi-layered epic that has stood the test of time, and is studied by scholars and is being constantly retold by various authors. In India, for example, there are over 200 regional versions. So I’m officially part of this vast and vibrant storytelling tradition. Knowing this actually eased some of my writer’s anxiety, as it was at times daunting to tackle such a beloved story,” says Vrinda. 

For Vrinda, much of what makes the story so special are the pivotal characters. While Rama is oft-described as a deity, one of the things that endears him to Vrinda is the human struggles he undergoes. “The challenges he faces are ones that any of us can relate to,” she says.

“The story itself has so many of the classic elements that a modern reader craves: palace intrigue, romance, a prince in exile, an abducted princess, a three-dimensional villain, the battle of good vs evil. And perhaps most of all, the question of womanhood is central to the story, as I see it, turning it ultimately from a love-story to a tragedy. This is, at least, one of the most fascinating and admittedly disturbing aspects of the tale: how it treats its women. Our retelling is unique in that it focuses not only on the inner lives and feelings of the characters but also explores the place and personal power of the women.”

Sita as a Heroine

Not surprisingly, the female protagonist is Vrinda’s favorite in the fable.  

“Sita, to me, is the most fascinating of the characters. Despite being a central character around which the plot of the story moves, she has received very little stage time herself.  Isn’t this exactly the position that women across history have faced? In our work, we make an intentional effort to bring Sita into the spotlight.”

Sita in Shadows of the Sun DynastyTo some extent, Vrinda is taking the classic tale and bringing a bit of feminism to the storyline. 

“All over the world there is a rise in the collective consciousness towards elevating women, valuing girls, giving equal opportunity to children, regardless of gender. I was reflecting the other day on the power of our childhood stories (in Sweden). One of my favorite childhood authors is Astrid Lindgren, who wrote Pippi Longstocking and many other stories with strong and powerful female leads. This has impacted the Swedish consciousness, and I think women’s equality is a going strong there. This motivates me to be part of a storytelling effort that pays attention to the women and girls even in stories that already exist.”

Similarly, Madhavi Mangu is a strong female in Texas. Of East Indian ancestry, she was raised in Dubai and works as an IT manager for a major multi-national. In her spare time, she is dedicated to Austin Bhakti Yoga. As such, she is co-host of the book launch performance. “This is a MUST COME cultural event. Vish and Vrinda combine contemporary touch with a classic twist at the beautiful Sanctuary Church in Tarrytown. The book reading is presented through a unique format of Indian classical dance and music that symbolizes honesty, goodness and sacrifice.”

dr. Dream and his 333 bowls

Dr. Dream: Healing Through Sound Vibrations and Higher Frequencies

Dr. Dream led an ordinary life. He worked in marketing. Wore a tie. Jumped into web development. Followed a normal routine. Even had a conventional name — Mark Peebler. Then, he said goodbye. To it all. 

Dr. Dream as a Healer

Dr. Dream and his Tour of Love heads to Joshua Tree for contact in the Desert

Today, he lives out of a 26-foot RV. He’s in a different city, on average, every three days. He’ll be in Dallas May 6. Then, he heads West. I plan to catch him in Joshua Tree, California, May 20, for Contact in the Desert. In his refurbished life, instead of being surrounded by walls, computers and stress, he is enveloped with love. What you put forth, springs back to you. His latest offering is a Tour of Love  which he conceptualized in response to peoples’ needs. He says many are questioning what their life is about. Why are they on earth? 

“People are making changes,” says Dr. Dream. “They are searching for meaning. They’re recommitting and rededicating their lives, and wanting to be more in their hearts.”

He can relate. Dr. Dream was sitting in a million dollar home, with a nice sized bank account. He was living the life most Americans seek.  What society programs and conditions us to do. But, he wasn’t being fulfilled. That’s when he realized something was wrong with the status quo. There was “a void in my being,” he noted 13 years ago. 

That emptiness led to soul searching. As a result, he set out to share his personal truth and the nature of his realities. He recalls, “In this process, I lost my million-dollar home.  I probably sold my company, and exited that part of my existence, too early. But it was the right balance of getting back to what it’s all about. And it’s been amazing.”

dr. Dream and his 333 bowlsHealing Vibrations with 333 Bowls

As a Yoga Therapist, I appreciate sound therapy, including Tibetan bowls. In fact, I’ve met many bowl masters, and am familiar with the many ways in which they can be used therapeutically. Actually, that’s what drew me to Dr. Dream. As part of his Tour of Love, Dr. Dream leads healing bowl sessions like none other.

First, he uses 333 bowls. The number three, he says, is equated with the trinity. For him, that means receiving 1) Devine Perfection, 2) Health and 3) Guidance. “I’m always seeing 3-3-3. In my own experiences that’s been a big number for us.” 

“The wave that we facilitate, by and large, is not a sound bath. We don’t refer to it as a concert. We prefer people are sitting rather than laying down. Normally it’s a two-and-a-half hour experience. We take them through a process of connecting them with each of their chakras (one by one).” Dr. Dream explains, “We bring them a raw formulation of cacao. We put an essential oil on them for each chakra, and then we bring the bowl within inches of that chakra. We go up to the people 21 to 28 times in the experience.”

However, for Contact in the Desert, a mega-festival for people interested in other worlds, he has a different approach, that elicits the same results.

With the Help of Angels

At last year’s Contact in the Desert, 2500 people soaked up Dr. Dream’s sound therapy. To maximize the impact on each of the participants Dr. Dream brought in his band of 59 “angels.” First of all, 17 of the angels carried mister bottles filled with essential oils. Participants were sprayed with a different essential oil correlating to each of the chakras. In addition, surrounding the 2500 attendees in Joshua Tree were 40 root chakra bowls.  The remaining 293 bowls were played to awaken the other chakras. 

“We broke through our own ceiling that night,” he says based on what people told him they experienced.” 

Dr. Dream makes a large monthly donation to two Nepalese towns recovering from the 2015 earthquake. As part of his donation, they supply him with handmade bowls.  Hence, his tour of love is going full circle. “It’s a powerful energetic. That energetic is imbued in the bowls and people feel that. What we’re doing is creating a sacred space where people are just walking in, and normally people are blown away by it. The bowls have an energy that transcends the vibration.”

Plus, the experience is magnified by the use of essential oils.

Essential Oils to Boost Frequencies 

healing power of essential oilsNot surprisingly, I use essential oils, daily. Topically, internally, and aromatically. I have studied the healing properties of the different oils, from a practical standpoint, from an energetic platform and from an Ayurvedic perspective. As such, I recommend them in my Yoga Therapy personalized action plans.  However, Dr. Dream takes healing via essential oils to another level. This fascinates me. Plus, he isn’t just pulling ideas out of the sky.

When I spoke with Dr. Dream, he referred to a study done in conjunction with John Hopkins University. That research identified the different frequencies of essential oils along with the frequencies of the healthy and diseased human body.  

The Hopkins study taps into learnings from another prolific source, that Dr. Dream has been privy to for about 15 years. During the WWII era, Dr. Royal Rife created a device to measure frequencies. “His premise was to identify frequencies of ailments and then heal them with other frequencies. He was able to see what different frequencies did to compromised cells.” 

Bruce Taino, of the Hopkins study, looked at essential oils and identified their frequency levels. For example, Dr. Dream explains that the average human body, during the day, has a frequency that may fluctuate between 62 and 68. Consequently, when someone has a cold, their frequency may drop to 58. Those with Candida will be closer to 55. Cancer patients are at 42. Finally, the onset of death hovers at 25. 

Dr. Dream was intrigued by what needed to be done to maintain a higher frequency. The solution was quite simple. 

Roses to the Rescue

rose essential oils“The study showed rose (essential oil) being the highest frequency. It’s a very very powerful oil. It activates and expands the energy of the heart. As a human, you can’t go wrong with rose.”

No wonder, people are attracted to roses. “It’s always been held in high esteem. Even in our Hallmark culture of holidays, rose has been very big. It takes 60,000 roses to make an ounce of (pure therapeutic grade) rose oil. When you’re looking at that, it starts to make sense. How we feel when we look at roses, and when we smell roses…it’s no surprise. It’s a nice energetic.”

Interestingly, among the essential oils in my personal medicine cabinet is rose, which my Ayurvedic doctor encouraged me to use every night. Especially relevant, I use frankincense and helichrysum for healing, which follow rose at the top of the frequency chart. Internally, I tend to add peppermint to my water. 

helichrysum essential oilPeppermint scores a 78. Frankincense has a frequency level of 147, helichrysum 181, and 320 for Rose. 

Dr. Dream explains that the higher the frequency of the oil, the more it heals the spiritual body, whereas, if the oil has a lower frequency, it heals the physical body.  “I’m big on helping people learn about essential oils, and frankincense is called the king of oils.  Peppermint is a very physical oil. On the surface it gives you energy and a recharge. For a lot of people it lets them let go of stress.”

According to Dr. Dream, everything is connected to frequency. Resonance. Energy. Expansiveness. The auric field. Biofield. “It’s all tied together. Anything that has us constricted, reduces our biofield. Anything that has us expansive, raises our frequency. The most important tool is our minds. How we’re thinking of things — our belief systems. The people that are victims are manifesting more as victims. People that are positive and giving, they are getting validated. I live a very blissful existence. Not that I don’t have challenges. But I’m happy. I look around, and see everything and celebrate. The nature of my reality is that source sees that and says I’ll give you more of that.”

Bowls and essential oils are the why of his existence. “I’ve never met anyone less special than me. If I can find bliss, abundance and peace within…if i can do that, than anyone can do that.  I believe that at this time, for where we are as humanity, that it is very important to find opportunities to expand our knowledge and expand our feeling body and allow ourselves to find those things that we are drawn to.  Anyone that shows up at our experience is ready for an expansive experience.”

Contact in the Desert

Contact in the Desert, Joshua Tree, CAOf course, the energy in your back yard is likely not the same as the venues Dr. Dream frequents. In other words, healing energies can be expected to be heightened in Joshua Tree. Set in the high desert, Joshua Tree is a sacred space where I head every year for Bhakti Fest. 

“Joshua Tree is one of the most special places in the world,” says Dr. Dream. “The energy is so conducive to feeling good. I get to be the beacon of remembrance, and love. I get to be the beta trigger in that sea of information and get them back into their hearts. It’s the most beautiful role for me to be that beacon of love and that reminder of that it all comes back to our heart.”

Joshua Tree, California, one of the most famous UFO sighting areas in America, is the site for the largest UFO conference in the U.S.  In addition to Dr. Dream, Contact in the Desert unites presenters including Chariots of the Gods author Erich von Daniken, “Ancient Aliens” star Giorgio A. Tsoukalos, George Noory host of “Coast to Coast AM,” Fingerprints of the Gods author Graham Hancock, Disclosure Project founder Dr. Steven Greer, and best-selling author of the Communion series, Whitley Strieber.  Also leading workshops or discussions are Alaska Senator Mike Gravel, popular “Ancient Aliens” expert Robert Schoch, Secret Space Program veteran Corey Goode, and Aztec sighting incident authorities Scott and Suzanne Ramsey.

 

Simrit Kaur

Music and Mantra Healing — Simrit Kaur Interview

Invoking the Warrior Within, With Simrit Kaur

Simrit Kaur and Deborah Charnes of the Namaste CounselRecently, I had to heal from a bad dog bite, and deep second degree burn. My daily yoga practice was placed on hold for nearly two months, as I tapped into other modes of yoga needed.  As a result, I chanted for almost three hours a day. Mostly, the Ra Ma Da Sa kundalini healing mantra, including Simrit Kaur’s recording. I invoked the sacred syllables and words that represent life’s elements like the sun and moon. I chanted day and night. In bed. At the beach. On the bus. I shut the outer world out to absorb and retain the prana and healing energies of the universe. 

 Simrit Kaur‘s was one of my favorite renditions.  It was trance-like, rhythmic and celestial. Simrit believes this mantra is great medicine. “(When) we chant this mantra with our own voices…it’s more powerful than even listening to someone else do it.” While there are many ways to interpret Ra Ma Da Sa, she notes its power of providing internal balance which says, “I am that infinite healing that is within me.”

Now that I’m back to normal, it was a real treat to meet up with Simrit, in Miami, as her band was setting up.

Simrit launches her Resilience Global Unity Tour Wednesday, March 15. The world premiere takes place within the zen-like setting at The Sacred Space*  in Miami’s Wynwood district off North Second Avenue. From here, she heads to St. Petersburg on the other side of Florida, Asheville, N.C., with many performances on the way to Canada.

Unity in Sacred Spaces

The Sacred Space, MiamiDespite her accolades on iTunes, World Charts and Billboard Music, Simrit has graced South Florida with her beautiful blend of mantra music only once before. She feels particularly grateful to return to this multi-cultural music mecca. Miami is a good fit, as her new album is about cultural blends, that reflect her own life, growing up Greek in the deep south. “This new album has to do with all of us coming together,” she says. “Diversity is the strength of the community.”

She’s looking forward to people from all backgrounds coming together and having a good time in Miami.

“This space is awesome. It’s rad.  I love that they have Reggae outside. Inside, it’s like a museum space. It’s an oasis,” she says.

Her full band, uniting from other parts of the country, includes world percussion, harmonium, the 21-string West African kora, cello, electronics, and vocals. While some may consider her music mantra meditation, or kirtan, influences from other cultures is clear.  Many of her songs are sung in Gurmukhi, the language of the Sikhs, but she also sings in English, and in her latest album, Resistance, has a subtle global warrior undertone to her tunes  

Tuning Up Intuition with Mantras

Simrit Kaur band at The Sacred Space“People tell me it’s a highly engaging experience. It takes people on a journey,” Simrit says about their dynamic style of music. 

The journey, is knowing oneself. Tuning into the heart. Intuition. 

“Mantra is the projection of the mind,” she says. “It’s not spiritual. It’s practical. It changes the chemistry of the brain…blood…body. It widens our perspective. It acts like a drug. We’re happy (when we practice mantra meditation) because we feel ourself. It has its own rhythmic pulse…and electromagnetic fields…”

She explains that it’s easy to get in touch with who you are. In fact, all mantras  are based on primal universal sounds that take you to that same place. Consequently, they are accessible by all, and empower intuition.

“Intuition has to do with not knowing. Feeling.  I don’t care to know everything,” she adds. 

Most noteworthy, the power of communal versus individual mantra is considerably stronger. Hence, guests at her concerts can expect to leave in a state of bliss. Ananda.  

“When one person is emitting a positive vibration, it affects the whole earth,” she says, talking about the scientifically proven theories about the power of meditation. She likens it to a ripple effect. “If you have a little bit of water, and then 500 times that, it’s so much more powerful. We feel inspired when we’re together. When we come together with music, sound and mantra, it has an exponential effect.”

Heal The World

That’s one of the purposes of her Resilience World Tour, and the name of her latest album, “Songs of Resilience.”   She believes that challenges only make one stronger.

“Songs of Resilience” is about her personal journey. She says her most recent music is about human conditions — and suffering — since the beginning of time. Simrit was born in Greece. An orphan, she was adopted by a Greek-American family. Her younger brother, who was also adopted from Greece, was a special needs child for whom she had to give considerable care and attention. Early on, she questioned the real meaning of life. She recognized the challenges that Greeks have been going through for thousands of years. And, the state of our society today. Especially in light of the intense isolation many of us consider as the norm, nowadays. 

Connecting With Your Roots

Simrit Kaur“That’s a big sickness of our time. Being alone,” she says, alluding to how music can heal. “We can create an incredible experience in tumultuous times. Music is a powerful medium. We feel inspired when we’re together.”

Simrit is saddened by the lack of family unity, and honoring of one’s heritage. Similarly, she says the abandoning of one’s roots is “a disease in America.” Her adoptive family passed on their respect for traditions and family. 

“Our parents were rooted in the Greek culture. They’re like yogis in the truest sense,” she says about her parents. Even though they don’t do yoga on the mat. “They taught us to be loving and kind. We do yoga to be expansive.”

As part of the global tour, Simrit, her husband and child, will spend time in her birthplace. Then, in April, she has two performances in Paros, Greece, before heading north to Estonia, Latvia, Finland, Sweden and Norway.  Finally, the tour ends in Mexico City in October. 

Tickets available at BrightStar.  

*Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Before or after the show, ticket holders receive 10 percent off food and drink at Plant Food Wine, located inside The Sacred Space.